Preview Screening of: The Emperor of All Maladies

CANCER logo white med

This three-part, six-hour major television event is presented by preeminent documentary filmmaker Ken Burns and directed by award-winning filmmaker Barak Goodman. Airing March 30-April 1 on KCTS 9, the film is based on the Pulitzer prize-winning book, “The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer,” by Siddhartha Mukherjee, MD. Learn more about the film and explore videos at cancerfilms.org.

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

The Seasons Performance Hall
101 N. Naches Ave. Yakima
Doors Open 6:00 p.m.
Screening & Discussion 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Open to the public at no charge. Space is available on a first come, first serve basis. This event made possible through partnership with KCTS 9 Public Television and Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital Comprehensive Cancer Care Line.

Register your attendance here

Screening followed by a moderated discussion panel including:

  • Vicky E. Jones, MD Medical Director, Medical Oncology, North Star Lodge
  • Shawn Murphy, Cancer Survivor
  • TBA

Memorial’s Comprehensive Cancer Care Line provides diagnostic and treatment services for all types of cancer. Patients receive individualized treatment from a multidisciplinary team that is truly passionate about cancer prevention, detection, treatment and support.

Classes and Events This Week

Events for March 1 – 7
Mon
Mar 2
9:00 am Our Toxic Environment (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
10:00
Our Toxic Environment – In the United States, we allow over 10,000 food and chemical additives into our food supply. Learn how to use diet to combat the effects of environmental toxins.

Classes are…

10:00 am Mom and Baby Group
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
11:30
Bring your baby (up to 12 months old) and join other moms to discuss
parenting topics, postpartum health and safety and early intervention.

Support group will not meet on holidays.

11:00 am Our Toxic Environment (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
12:00
Our Toxic Environment – In the United States, we allow over 10,000 food and chemical additives into our food supply. Learn how to use diet to combat the effects of environmental toxins.

Classes are…

11:30 am Lamplight Bible Study/support group
North Star Lodge
Ends @
1:00
Lamplight Bible Study is designed for cancer patients and their caregivers/family members. You will see how the Bible can help navigate through their cancer journey. Classes held every 1st and 3rd Mon…
2:00 pm Cancer Support Group (co-ed)
North Star Lodge
Ends @
3:00
Co-ed Support Group for cancer patients, families and caregivers on the first Monday and every third Wednesday of the month.  Topics may include diet, exercise, treatment side effects from chemo/radia…
3:00 pm Our Toxic Environment (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
4:00
Our Toxic Environment – In the United States, we allow over 10,000 food and chemical additives into our food supply. Learn how to use diet to combat the effects of environmental toxins.

Classes are…

5:00 pm Grupo de Apoyo de Padre a Padre en Español -Sunnyside Ends @
6:30
El Programa de Padre a Padre ofrece apoyo emocional e información a familias criando a niños con necesidades especiales de salud o atrasos en el desarrollo. Los Eventos y las clases patrocinadas por P…
6:00 pm Pre-natal Yoga
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
7:00
Pre-natal Yoga helps decrease tension, improve flexibility and
strength, prepare for the birthing process, and cultivate a connection
between mother and child. No Yoga experience necessary!  If you…
Tue
Mar 3
12:00 pm North Star Knitters
North Star Lodge
Ends @
2:00
Cast on to this active, fun-loving group of knitters (many survivors) and learn to knit, crochet and teach others. All the yarn is provided and the laughs are free. Ask your oncologist or nurse about…
2:00 pm My Health, My Life (Orientation and 6 Classes)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
4:30
My Health, My Life is designed to help individuals who suffer from chronic illness learn simple techniques on how to live a healthy life
by managing their symptoms. This six-week program will help you…
6:00 pm Living with loss -8 week discussion based course
Harman Center
Ends @
7:00
Living with Loss:  An 8-week discussion-based course working through the book, Understanding Your Grief: Ten Essential Touchstones for Finding Hope and Healing Your Heart.
6:30 pm Childbirth Education 4-Week Series (Tuesdays, 3 of 4)
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
8:30
Class covers: what to expect during late pregnancy, labor delivery and postpartum. Learn relaxation and breathing techniques, comfort measures and discuss medication options for delivery. Please note:…
7:00 pm Diabetes Support Group (see notes for topic)
Memorial Diabetes Management and Wellness
Ends @
8:00
The Center for Diabetes Prevention and Control provides a genuine understanding of diabetes self-management and is committed to helping those with diabetes gain the skills and confidence needed to suc…
Wed
Mar 4
5:00 pm Mom and Baby Group
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
6:15
Bring your baby (up to 12 months old) and join other moms to discuss
parenting topics, postpartum health and safety and early intervention.

Support group will not be held on holidays.

7:00 pm Mr. Naches High School Pageant
See notes for details
Ends @
9:00
Mr. Naches pageant will be held at the Naches Middle School. Proceeds benefit children’s healthcare programs at Memorial Hospital and Children’s Village.
Thu
Mar 5
9:00 am Diabetes Wellness – (Classes at 9 am and 1 pm)
Memorial Diabetes Management and Wellness
Ends @
12:00
This Diabetes Wellness program is for patients who are newly diagnosed with diabetes, or those seeking to gain additional education to self manage their diabetes.  The class is delivered in 4 sessions…
12:00 pm Sound Sleep-Sound Rest -Intro and Full Session
North Star Lodge
Ends @
2:00
A cancer diagnosis can cause anxiety, stress and sometimes
depression for patients and their caregivers. There are natural
ways to combat these side effects and it’s something anyone
can learn.
An…
1:00 pm Diabetes Wellness – (Classes at 9 am and 1 pm)
Memorial Diabetes Management and Wellness
Ends @
4:00
This Diabetes Wellness program is for patients who are newly diagnosed with diabetes, or those seeking to gain additional education to self manage their diabetes.  The class is delivered in 4 sessions…
3:00 pm Cottage in the Meadow tours
Cottage in the Meadow
Ends @
4:00
Tour Cottage in the Meadow and receive up to date information regarding the Hospice, Transitions and Cottage programs
6:00 pm Tomando Contro de su Salud/My Health, My Life (Orientacion y 6 clases)
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
8:30
My Health, My Life is designed to help individuals who suffer from chronic illness learn simple techniques on how to live a healthy life
by managing their symptoms. This six-week program will help you…
Fri
Mar 6
9:00 am Eating Healthy on the go (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
10:00
Eating Healthy on the Go – Food choices away from home are important to your health and weight because many of us are eating more meals away from home. Fortunately, making healthy choices in restauran…
11:00 am Eating Healthy on the go (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
12:00
Eating Healthy on the Go – Food choices away from home are important to your health and weight because many of us are eating more meals away from home. Fortunately, making healthy choices in restauran…
2:30 pm Solo para mamografías—rayos X de senos.
‘Ohana Mammography Center
Ends @
4:30
Cuide de lo que verdaderamente es importante – su Salud.

¿No tiene cobertura médica?
‘Ohana tiene información de programas que ayudan a cubrir el costo de este importante examen.
Llame para más…

Walk-in Clinic for Screening Mammograms
‘Ohana Mammography Center
Ends @
5:30
`Ohana, Memorials Mammography center, offers a walk-in clinic for screening mammograms, Fridays, 2:30–5:30 p.m.  No appointment is necessary and interpreters are available. The name of the doctor who…
3:00 pm Eating Healthy on the go (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
4:00
Eating Healthy on the Go – Food choices away from home are important to your health and weight because many of us are eating more meals away from home. Fortunately, making healthy choices in restauran…
Sat
Mar 7
9:00 am Clases de Preparación para el Parto en Español
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
5:00
Clases de Preparación para el Parto en Español:
La clase de preparación para el parto es una excelente idea, porque en ella te explicarán lo que sucede cuando das a luz y te enseñarán formas de…

Tip: Click  to add an event to your Yahoo!, Microsoft Outlook, MSN Hotmail, Apple iCal, or Google calendar.

Upcoming Events for March 8 – 14
Sun Mar 8 1:00 pm Childbirth Education, Sunday 2-day class (Day 1) (Memorial’s Community Education Center)
Mon Mar 9 9:00 am Goal Setting (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
10:00 am Mom and Baby Group (Memorial’s Community Education Center)
11:00 am Goal Setting (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
3:00 pm Goal Setting (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
5:30 pm Gathering at Powerhouse* (The Powerhouse Grill)
6:00 pm Pre-natal Yoga (Memorial’s Community Education Center)
Tue Mar 10 12:00 pm North Star Knitters (North Star Lodge)
2:00 pm My Health, My Life (Orientation and 6 Classes) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
3:00 pm Look Good-Feel Better (Wellness House)
6:00 pm Living with loss -8 week discussion based course (Harman Center)
6:30 pm Childbirth Education 4-Week Series (Tuesdays, 4 of 4) (Memorial’s Community Education Center)
Wed Mar 11 9:00 am Heart 101 (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
11:00 am Heart 101 (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
1:00 pm Better Breathers Club (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
3:00 pm Heart 101 (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
5:00 pm Mom and Baby Group (Memorial’s Community Education Center)
6:00 pm Clase de dar Pecho y Cuidado Básico del Bebé (Memorial’s Community Education Center)
Clase de dar Pecho y Cuidado Básico del Bebé (Memorial’s Community Education Center)
Thu Mar 12 9:00 am Diabetes Wellness – (Classes at 9 am and 1 pm) (Memorial Diabetes Management and Wellness)
12:00 pm Sound Sleep-Sound Rest -Intro and Full Session (North Star Lodge)
1:00 pm Diabetes Wellness – (Classes at 9 am and 1 pm) (Memorial Diabetes Management and Wellness)
6:00 pm Tomando Contro de su Salud/My Health, My Life (Orientacion y 6 clases) (Memorial’s Community Education Center)
Fri Mar 13 9:00 am D.A.S.H. Diet (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
11:00 am D.A.S.H. Diet (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
2:30 pm Solo para mamografías—rayos X de senos. (‘Ohana Mammography Center)
Walk-in Clinic for Screening Mammograms (‘Ohana Mammography Center)
3:00 pm D.A.S.H. Diet (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
Sat Mar 14 9:00 am Childbirth Education -1 day class, Saturday (Memorial’s Community Education Center)

View the entire calendar online

The importance of calling 911 during a heart attack

Cardiovascular disease is the No. 1 killer of men and women in the United States. It includes heart disease, stroke and high blood pressure. As February is American Heart Month, Memorial’s Dennis Hoover and Tony Miller, Yakima County’s EMS Manager, talked about the importance of calling 911 during a heart attack on KIT 1280 on Feb. 24, 2015.

What should I do if I see that someone is having a heart attack?

A heart attack is when there is a loss of blood flow and oxygen to the heart muscle. The first thing people should do if they see someone is having a heart attack is call 911.

  • On average, data shows that calling 911 gives a 20-minute head start to the administration of treatment than if a patient arrives by private vehicle. In addition, there is the risk the patient could lose consciousness while driving him or herself or while being driven by a family member or friend, who would be unable to help them.
  • It’s not just about getting a ride to the hospital.
    • EMS can start intervention upon arrival to the patient – whether it’s CPR to keep blood flowing to the brain and other vital organs, or an AED.
    • The patient can be monitored while being transported to the hospital.
    • EMS can notify the hospital prior to arrival so the hospital staff prepare for the patient. If it’s the middle of the night, that means the heart team has already been notified and is already en route to the hospital to meet you there.
  • Every minute that passes from the time of on-set of chest pain, more heart muscle dies and the likelihood of long-term damage to the heart increases. This directly effects short- and long-term survival.

 

Why wouldn’t someone call 911?

  • Some people aren’t sure they’re having a heart attack or stroke. They don’t want to make a big deal about it. They don’t want to be viewed as weak, or they fear ridicule if it turns out to be less serious.
  • Some worry about the financial cost of the ambulance ride. Most insurance policies cover emergency treatment, but there is no guarantee. Out-of-pocket expenses vary greatly among insurance carriers. But the costs that can arise from medical complications from delaying treatment can be far higher, as can the cost of having a worse outcome.

How big a problem is heart disease in the Yakima Valley?

Major cardiovascular diseases – heart disease and stroke – are the leading cause of death in Yakima County.

 

Each year over 100 people in Yakima have a serious type of Heart Attack (called a STEMI) that requires treatment in a cath lab in less than 90 minutes.  Only a handful of these are a cardiac arrest, where CPR or an Automatic External Defibrillator (or AED) might be used.

  • Only a heart monitor, called an EKG,  can determine if the chest pain is this serious form of heart attack (STEMI)
  • Only about 1 in 3 (33 percent) people in Yakima with the STEMI type heart attack call 911 for EMS response. EMS start treatment and perform the EKG within a few minute of arrival and can help diagnose a Heart Attack before reaching the hospital.

Frequently asked questions:

 

What should I do if I have a heart attack in Yakima?

Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital is categorized as a Level 1 cardiac center and Level 2 stroke center by the Washington State Department of Health, which are the top categories in our region. The timely services for heart attack and stroke are unsurpassed by any other hospital in our area.

What is cardiac rehabilitation?

Cardiac rehabilitation (also called cardiac rehab) is a medically supervised program of exercise, education and support for people with heart disease to improve their health. People who can benefit include those who have had a heart attack within the past year, congestive heart failure, angina and heart surgery or a heart procedure.

Is cardiac rehabilitation available in Yakima?

The cardiac rehab team at Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital includes doctors (such as your primary care doctor, your surgeon, and a cardiologist who will monitor your plan and progress), specially trained cardiac rehab nurses, and dietitians or nutritionists. This team also includes a care coordinator who will track your care and navigate insurance concerns.

The Importance of Cardiac Rehab

February is National Heart Month. Kristy Little, nurse manager at Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital’s Cardiac Rehabilitation Center, talks more about the importance of cardiac rehab following a heart attack during a Feb. 17, 2015 appearance on KIT 1280.

What is cardiac rehab?

Cardiac rehabilitation is a medically supervised program of exercise, education and support for people with heart disease to restore good health and improve their quality of life.  It is meant to reduce the chance of future cardiac problems and helps people live life to its fullest.  The work is done by the patient.

Who benefits?

According to the American Heart Association, cardiac rehab can help people who’ve had:

  • A heart attack
  • Coronary artery disease
  • Heart failure
  • Angina
  • A heart procedure, such as a balloon angioplasty or a pacemaker implant
  • Heart surgery, such as a bypass operation or valve replacement
  • GETTING PEOPLE TO TAKE PERSONAL RESPONSIBIILTY FOR THEIR OWN HEALTH INVOLVES BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION.  IT’S NOT EASY, BUT IT CAN BE DONE, ONE STEP AT A TIME.

 

Where do people get treated?

Cardiac rehab may take place at the hospital or in another location.

  • Memorial’s Cardiac Rehab program is located on South 30th Avenue across the street from the hospital in the West Pavilion Two building, on the second floor above the offices of the Yakima Heart Center.
  • The program may last a few weeks or up to a year, although three months is common
  • Medicare and health plans often cover the cost for the first two or three months
  • You must be referred by a health care provider.

 

What happens at rehab?

The rehab team will evaluate your overall health, lifestyle, medical conditions and limitations. Then they’ll tailor a program just for you. In rehab you may:

  • Work with a nutritionist to set up a heart-healthy eating plan
  • Learn how to exercise safely, possibly using a treadmill, bike, rowing machine, track or weight machines
  • Learn how to control chronic health conditions, such as diabetes or high blood pressure
  • Learn ways to reduce stress
  • Learn about your medications and how to take them
  • Get tips for quitting smoking and losing weight
  • Get counseling about returning to work and to activities you enjoy
  • You’ll meet others who’ve been through a similar life event. That camaraderie can help you stick with your program and make the transition back to an active life.
  • Rehab also is a place to find help for the emotional upheaval that is common after heart surgery or heart problems. Depression, anxiety and anger shouldn’t be ignored. They can affect you physically and keep you from recovering.

For more information, visit  call 576-7650.

Kick the Can-the soda can that is-to the Curb!

Kim McCorquodale RD, CSO at North Star Lodge

Oh, why I should not drink soda, let me count the reasons. There are all those empty calories if you drink soda with sugar, or all those artificial sweeteners if you drink the diet stuff like I do. Plus a lot of other stuff we don’t need in our bodies, such as caffeine and high levels of phosphorus that can leach the calcium from our bones (not good). And think of all the money you’d save if you stopped! The expense of soda when eating out can rival the food! So, there are lots of great reasons to stop, but how do we get started?

Some tips to help you kick that habit are:

  1. Make a plan and write it down. Don’t try to quit cold-turkey if you are drinking several a day. We generally are more successful when committing to small changes, so start with cutting back to one can each day, then two cans, etc.
  2. Check out all the drink alternatives out there. If you crave that carbonation, try adding a splash of juice to sparkling water. Or add citrus fruit, mint, or cucumber slices to water to jazz it up (see a previous blog on flavored water).
  3. Keep these alternatives around so making a better choice is easier. Just a little pre-planning will really help increase your success.
  4. Adopt a no-soda at home policy, or a no-soda at work policy, or wherever you are most tempted. If it’s not there, you will have to make a bigger effort to drink it.

Please join with me as I try these tips now before the summer months arrive and drinking a cold soda is even more tempting. You, and I, will be well on our way to improving our overall health if we do.

Learn at Lunch at NSL – Healthy Habits for Life Starts February 18

 

NSL Nutrition Services wants to let you know of an opportunity to learn and apply lifelong habits to increase your health and fitness. We are hosting a Learn at Lunch and will discuss Healthy Habits for Life. The first in the 4-part series starts tomorrow, February 18th, from 12-1PM at NSL. The program was developed by the WA State Dairy Council and is designed to help you make gradual, but permanent, changes that will improve your overall health. Isn’t that what we all want?

Please call our department to register 509- 574-3408. There is no charge (donations always appreciated), and a light lunch will be provided.

Technology works for tracking fitness

walkingFeb. 16, 2015—There’s a new reason to embrace technology: It can track our fitness, and it can track it—at least our steps—accurately, according to a study from the University of Pennsylvania.

Researchers found that many fitness tracking tools, such as wearable devices and smartphones, can count our steps with little fault. The research helps solidify technology’s role in fitness—and may encourage some people to start adding tracking devices to their exercise arsenals.

About the study

Researchers recruited 14 people to test top-selling smartphone applications and wearable devices designed to track physical activity. Each person:

  • Wore a Digi-Walker SW-200 pedometer as well as 2 accelerometers, the Fitbit Zip and Fitbit One, on his or her waistband.
  • Wore 3 wearable devices—a Fitbit Flex, a Jawbone UP24 and a Nike Fuelband—on his or her wrist.
  • Carried an Apple iPhone 5S running 3 iOS apps—Fitbit, Health Mate and Moves—at the same time in a pants pocket.
  • Carried a Samsung Galaxy S4 running the Moves Android app in the other pants pocket.

The participants had all the devices on them at the same time while walking 3 miles per hour on a treadmill for tests of 500 and 1500 steps. An observer counted each person’s steps using a tally counter.

Compared with the observer’s counts, many of the apps and devices were largely accurate.

The most accurate were the pedometer and accelerometers worn on the waistband. These recorded a relative difference in either direction of 1 percent or less. Smartphone applications also did very well, showing a difference of about 6.5 percent.

Wearable wrist devices showed a wider range, with some being quite accurate. Their relative difference was 22.7 percent to 1.5 percent lower than actual step counts. However, only the Nike Fuelband reported that steps were more than 20 percent less than the actual count.

The findings suggest that technology may be better at monitoring fitness than people might expect. With smartphone use widespread in the United States, apps or devices that connect to our phones offer an easy way for Americans to track—and possibly increase—our activity levels, researchers say.

Read the study in The Journal of the American Medical Association .

The take-home message
Devices and smartphone apps may offer an easy way to become more engaged with physical activity. And walking is an inexpensive, low-risk way to start putting this tech to use. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), 150 weekly minutes of moderate intensity exercise, such as brisk walking, can:

  • Improve cholesterol
  • Lower blood pressure
  • Increase energy
  • Strengthen bones
  • Prevent weight gain

Best of all, starting a walking program is easy. The AHA says all you need are comfortable, loose-fitting clothes; supportive sneakers; and socks made from synthetic materials to help wick away moisture and prevent blisters.

It’s best to start by walking for short periods of time, such as 10 minutes, and gradually add a few more minutes each week.

If you begin walking, keep these tips from the AHA in mind:

  • Warm up at an easy tempo before picking up the pace
  • Add variety with brisk intervals
  • Walk up hills to tone your legs and burn more calories
  • Stretch your hamstrings; calves; and chest, shoulders and back at the end of your walk

Finally, always remember to walk safely. Bring along a partner when you can, or keep your phone handy for emergencies. If you choose to wear headphones, keep the volume low so you can hear your surroundings. Walk on sidewalks rather than the street, and wear light colors or reflective clothing to help drivers know you’re there.

 

Kohl’s, Memorial Hospital Partner on Health and Wellness Programs

YAKIMA, Wash. — Kohl’s Department Stores and Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital are partnering to bring health and wellness programs to Yakima, including fitness and cooking classes.

Beginning in February and through fall 2015, Memorial will be offering weekly yoga and Zumba classes, a fitness boot camp and cooking classes to help improve the health of the Yakima community. The program is being made possible through a $28,494 donation to Memorial by Kohl’s.

The Healthy for Life Program includes the following classes provided at no charge to participants, which have already started and are currently available unless otherwise noted:

  • Gentle Yoga

Tuesdays, 7:15 p.m.-8:15 p.m.

Yoga Collective, 2600 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima

  • Bilingual Zumba

Wednesdays, 7 p.m.-8 p.m. (starting Feb. 18)

Adams Elementary School, 723 S. 8th St., Yakima

  • Bilingual Yoga

Thursdays, 7:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m.

Yoga Collective, 2600 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima

  • Boot Camp

Fridays, 5:30 p.m.-6:15 p.m.

Rock Solid Fitness, 1109 S. 22nd Ave., Unit B, Yakima

  • Cooking classes (Spanish)

April 9, April 16, April 23, April 30, 6 p.m-7 p.m.

Memorial Education Center, 2506 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima

 

  • Cooking classes (English)

Thursday, June 18, June 25, July 2, July 9, 6 p.m.-7 p.m.

Memorial Education Center, 2506 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima

The Kohl’s donation also allows once again for the purchase of 1,000 bike helmets for area children, which will be distributed at Memorial’s annual Fiesta de Salud Health Fair in July and at other community events.

Since 2012, Kohl’s has donated more than $45,000 to Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital and The Memorial Foundation. Other Memorial initiatives supported through Kohl’s include Children’s Village, YouthWorks and other child safety programs through community education

Kohl’s commitment to Memorial is made possible through the Kohl’s Cares® cause merchandise program. Through this initiative, Kohl’s sells $5 books and plush toys, where 100 percent of net profit benefits children’s health and education programs nationwide, including hospital partnerships like this one. Kohl’s has raised more than $257 million through this merchandise program. In addition to the merchandise program, Kohl’s Cares features the Kohl’s Cares Scholarship Program, which last year recognized more than 2,500 young volunteers with more than $400,000 in scholarships and prizes. Through the Kohl’s Associates in Action volunteer program, more than 834,000 associates have donated more than 2.7 million hours of their time since 2001, and Kohl’s has donated more than $79 million to youth-focused nonprofit organizations. Kohl’s also offers fundraising gift cards for schools and youth-serving organizations. For more information, visit www.Kohls.com/Cares.

About Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital

Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital is a 226-bed, acute-care, community hospital serving Central Washington’s Yakima Valley. Memorial Family of Services includes primary care practices and specialty care services, including high-quality cardiac care, a continuum of cancer care, hospice care and advanced services for children with special health care needs. Visit Memorial online at yakimamemorial.org or on Facebook (www.facebook.com/yakimavalleymemorialhospital), Twitter (www.twitter.com/Yakima_Memorial) or Pinterest (www.pinterest.com/yvmh).

About Kohl’s

Kohl’s (NYSE: KSS) is a leading specialty department store with 1,163 stores in 49 states. With a commitment to inspiring and empowering families to lead fulfilled lives, the company offers amazing national and exclusive brands, incredible savings and inspiring shopping experiences in-store, online at Kohls.com and via mobile devices. Committed to our communities, Kohl’s has raised more than $257 million for children’s initiatives nationwide through its Kohl’s Cares® cause merchandise program, which operates under Kohl’s Cares, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Kohl’s Department Stores, Inc. For additional information about Kohl’s philanthropic and environmental initiatives, visit www.Kohls.com/Cares. For a list of store locations and information, or for the added convenience of shopping online, visit www.Kohls.com.

 

Connect with Kohl’s:

Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/Kohls)

Twitter (http://twitter.com/Kohls)

Google+ (http://plus.google.com/+Kohls)

Pinterest (http://pinterest.com/Kohls)

Instagram (http://instagram.com/Kohls)

YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/kohls)

February is American Heart Month

 

February is American Heart Month – a time to learn about your risks for heart disease and stroke and learn tips for staying “heart healthy.” Cardiovascular disease is the No. 1 killer of men and women in the United States. It includes heart disease, stroke and high blood pressure. Dr. Dave Krueger of the Yakima Heart Center talked about heart health on KIT 1280 on Feb. 10, 2015.

How big a problem is heart disease in the Yakima Valley?

Major cardiovascular diseases – heart disease and stroke – are the leading cause of death in Yakima County.

There are many risk factors associated with coronary heart disease and stroke. Some risk factors such as family history, ethnicity and age, cannot be changed.

Other risk factors that can be treated or changed include:

  • Smoking
  • high blood pressure or hypertension
  • high cholesterol
  • obesity
  • physical inactivity or lack of exercise
  • diabetes
  • unhealthy diets
  • harmful use of alcohol

High cholesterol, obesity and high blood pressure are the three leading diseases we see here in Yakima County, and they increase a person’s risk for developing heart disease.

What steps should I take to prevent a heart attack or cardiovascular disease?

  • Get a checkup at least once a year, even if you feel healthy. Know your numbers – blood pressure, cholesterol, BMI.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. That means exercising regularly and eating a healthy diet, with plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables, high-fiber foods and foods that are low in saturated fat, trans fat and cholesterol. For more information on eating a healthy diet, visit the Center for Disease Control’s tip page at choosemyplate.gov.
  • Take your medicine. Follow instructions carefully if you’re taking medication to treat high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes or any other condition.
  • Limit alcohol use and don’t smoke!

What should I do if I see that someone is having a heart attack?

If cardiopulmonary resuscitation is performed in the first moments after cardiac arrest, it doubles a person’s chance of survival. CPR keeps blood flowing to the brain and other vital organs until emergency help arrives.

For untrained rescuers, the American Heart Association advises to begin CPR with chest compressions. Studies have shown that using chest compressions only is just as effective in re-starting a failing heart as doing the full version of CPR.

What about automated external defibrillators, or AEDs?

  • An automated external defibrillator (AED) is a computerized medical device.
  • It checks a person’s heart rhythm. It can recognize a rhythm that requires a shock. And it can advise the rescuer when a shock is needed.
  • The AED uses voice prompts, lights and text messages to tell the rescuer the steps to take.
  • AEDs are very accurate and easy to use.

Why are they useful?

During sudden cardiac arrest, the heart is often in a state of ventricular fibrillation (VF).  The ventricles are “fluttering” rather than pumping blood. CPR can help circulate oxygen-rich blood to the brain. However, according to the American Heart Association, to get the heart back into rhythm requires a shock from a defibrillator.

Simply put, AEDs can more than double the chance of survival for people who suffer sudden cardiac arrest.

Where can I find an AED?

AEDs are widely considered a public health tool and can be found in office buildings, malls, schools and sports stadiums.

What about an emergency where I don’t have assistance nearby?

There’s a downloadable app for mobile phones – the Pocket First Aid & CPR Smartphone App – available on iTunes. It’s been updated to reflect the latest guidelines for first aid, CPR and AED use by the American Heart Association and provides quick, clear first aid and CPR instructions from a user’s smartphone.

These instructions can help a user save a life in the event of an emergency.

 

 

 

A daily avocado may be the secret to healthy cholesterol

Feb. 8, 2015—An avocado a day could help keep high cholesterol at bay—particularly if you’re overweight—new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association suggests.

About the study

Researchers put 45 healthy, overweight adults on an average American diet—high in carbohydrates and fat—for 2 weeks. They were then randomly assigned to 1 of 3 different diets:

  • A low-fat diet.
  • A moderate-fat diet that contained heart-healthy monounsaturated fats from sources like canola and sunflower oil.
  • A moderate-fat diet that contained monounsaturated fats from a whole Hass avocado each day.

Forty participants rotated through all 3 diets, following each for 5 weeks with 2-week breaks in between. Three people completed 2 of the diets, and 2 completed only 1.

After 5 weeks, all 3 diets resulted in lower levels of both total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol , the bad kind of cholesterol that causes plaque in the arteries. But the avocado diet provided the best results, with the most significant decreases in LDL and total cholesterol.

The moderate-fat diets also did not lower HDL cholesterol—this is the good type of cholesterol that helps sweep LDL cholesterol out of the arteries—as much as the low-fat diet did.

The study, which was funded by the Hass Avocado Board, suggests that while all foods rich in monounsaturated fats contain fatty acids that are good for cholesterol, avocados may have an extra edge, thanks to their nutrient-dense nature.

Even so, the study supports the benefits of replacing saturated fats with any foods that contain healthier, unsaturated fats. Doing so may improve cholesterol levels and reduce the risk for heart disease.

Learn more about this study in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

The take-home message
Replacing the saturated fats in your diet with avocados may help lower cholesterol and reduce your risk for heart disease. But eating more of the green stuff is just 1 dietary step you can take toward a healthier ticker .

Knowing the difference between the types of fats and kinds of cholesterol can help you choose foods that are healthier.

Eating foods that are high in saturated fats raises cholesterol levels in your blood and increases your risk for a heart attack or stroke, which is why experts recommend limiting your intake of them.

Saturated fats are found in such foods as:

  • Fatty beef
  • Lamb
  • Poultry with skin
  • Lard
  • Dairy products, such as butter, cream and cheese, made with whole or 2 percent milk
  • Baked goods and fried foods

The majority of the fat you consume should come from monounsaturated or polyunsaturated sources, which can help lower levels of bad cholesterol in your blood and reduce your risk for a heart attack or stroke.

In addition to avocados, good sources of these fats include:

  • Olive or canola oil
  • Nuts and seeds, such as walnuts, sunflower seeds and flaxseeds
  • Fatty fish, such as salmon, herring or trout
  • Tofu and soybeans

Remember, all fats contain 9 calories per gram, and eating too much fat can contribute to weight gain. To maintain a healthy weight, even healthy fats should be eaten in moderation.