SCRUB SALE!!!

Mon. Oct.13th  7 am -6pm

Tues. Oct.14th  6am-4pm

Classroom B at Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital

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October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Memorial kicks off month with awareness, fundraising campaign

YAKIMA – All that pink has a purpose.

Three-hundred pink bras and hundreds of tiny pink lights are dangling from the trees outside ‘Ohana Mammography Center on Wednesday, as Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital and The Memorial Foundation kick off Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

The awareness and fundraising campaign aims to remind women about the importance of self-exams and mammograms and encourages local support for breast cancer services.

All this month, you can stop by ‘Ohana at 1515 W. Yakima Ave. to contribute to the foundation’s Breast Cancer Fund or visit keepsupportlocal.org to make a donation online. The Breast Cancer Fund provides scholarships for mammograms for women in need and helps pay for vital diagnostic equipment. In the past, money raised for the fund has helped to pay for a digital mammography machine and 3D ultrasound equipment, among other things.

The campaign also aims to remind women about the need for self-exams and mammograms. One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer, and an estimated 40,000 women will die from the disease in the United States this year, making breast cancer the second-leading cause of cancer death among women, behind lung cancer.

The bras will be taken down from the trees late Wednesday to be donated to the Women’s Resource Center of the YWCA of Yakima. The lights will remain up for the month of October.

About Memorial

Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital is a 226-bed, acute-care, not-for-profit, community hospital serving Central Washington’s Yakima Valley. Memorial Family of Services includes primary care practices and specialty care services, including high-quality cardiac care, a continuum of cancer care, hospice care and advanced services for children with special health care needs. Visit Memorial online at www.yakimamemorial.org or on Facebook (www.facebook.com/yakimavalleymemorialhospital), Twitter (www.twitter.com/Yakima_Memorial) or Pinterest (www.pinterest.com/yvmh). The Memorial Foundation has raised and distributed $45 million toward innovative health care programs in the Yakima Valley (www.memfound.org).

 

 

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Gaining just 5 extra pounds could raise blood pressure

Sept. 30, 2014—Most people understand that obesity has serious health risks. However, researchers are now suggesting that even a small weight gain can increase blood pressure.

New findings

Researchers set out to see what effect a small weight gain of about 5 to 11 pounds would have on overall health. They presented their findings at the American Heart Association‘s (AHA) “High Blood Pressure Research 2014 Scientific Sessions.”

Researchers used a 24-hour monitor to record the blood pressure of 26 people. The participants were normal-weight adults between 18 and 48 years old who did not smoke and were not taking any medications.

Sixteen of the participants were given an extra 400 to 1,200 calories every day for eight weeks. These excess calories increased each person’s weight by about 5 percent, or 5 to 11 pounds. After eight weeks, researchers compared these participants’ blood pressure levels to those of the remaining 10 individuals, whose weight hadn’t changed.

The results showed:

  • Those who gained weight had an increase in their systolic blood pressure. This top number of the blood pressure reading increased from an average of 114 mm Hg to an average of 118.
  • The participants who gained more weight inside their abdomens saw a greater increase in their blood pressure.
  • Gaining weight didn’t change people’s levels of cholesterol, insulin or blood sugar.

In addition, blood pressure increase was specifically related to increases in visceral fat in the abdomen. Visceral fat is the fat inside the abdomen, as opposed to fat just under the skin.

 

Learn more about the presentation here.

The take-home message
Gaining just a little bit of weight can have a negative effect on your health. While watching your weight go up and down a few pounds at a time might not seem like a big deal, every gain can affect your blood pressure. In turn, high blood pressure can contribute to a slew of health problems.

According to the AHA and the National Institutes of Health, high blood pressure starts when either:

  • The top number of the reading (the systolic pressure) is 140 or higher.
  • The bottom number of the reading (diastolic pressure) is 90 or higher .

It’s important to keep an eye on your weight, especially if you’re prone to putting on weight in your belly.

Your best bet? Keep your weight at a steady, healthy level, and check your blood pressure regularly. Consult with your doctor if you see dramatic changes or have concerns.

While high blood pressure may not always be recognized, it can silently cause many health problems. Take a look at this helpful review of how high blood pressure can damage your health.

 

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Classes and Events This Week

New and Updated Events
10/10, 9am Binational Health W…
Events for September 28 – October 4
Mon
Sep 29
9:00 am Label Reading (am class)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
10:00
Label Reading – Do you ever wonder what food labels actually mean? Learn how to read and understand the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Nutrition Facts found on packaged food.

Classes are one…

10:00 am Mom and Baby Group
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
12:00
Bring your baby (up to 12 months old) and join other moms to discuss
parenting topics, postpartum health and safety and early intervention.
11:00 am Label Reading (midday class)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
12:00
Label Reading – Do you ever wonder what food labels actually mean? Learn how to read and understand the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Nutrition Facts found on packaged food.

Classes are one…

1:30 pm LifeBio 101
North Star Lodge
Ends @
3:30
LifeBio 101

This class teaches you how to use the writing process to address the emotions that accompany the life-altering experience of a cancer diagnosis. LifeBio Guide, Sue Karstetter, Psy.D., wil…

3:00 pm Label Reading (pm class)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
4:00
Label Reading – Do you ever wonder what food labels actually mean? Learn how to read and understand the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Nutrition Facts found on packaged food.

Classes are one…

4:00 pm Diabetes Prevention Program orientation
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
4:30
This 30 minute information session about Memorial’s Diabetes Prevention program will explain the research behind this evidence based program and why it is proven to slow the progression to type 2 diab…
6:00 pm Pre-natal Yoga
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
7:00
Pre-natal Yoga helps decrease tension, improve flexibility and
strength, prepare for the birthing process, and cultivate a connection
between mother and child. No Yoga experience necessary!  If you…
Tue
Sep 30
8:00 am Diabetes Blood Sugar Screenings
Memorial Diabetes Prevention and Wellness
Ends @
10:00
Diabetes Blood Sugar and Foot Screenings-For most accurate blood sugar screening results, do not eat or drink anything 8-12 hours prior to screening.
Screens are held at the Center for Diabetes…
12:00 pm North Star Knitters
North Star Lodge
Ends @
2:00
Cast on to this active, fun-loving group of knitters (many survivors) and learn to knit, crochet and teach others. All the yarn is provided and the laughs are free. Ask your oncologist or nurse about…
2:00 pm My Health, My Life (Orientation and 6 Classes)
Memorial’s Classroom (A, B, or C)
Ends @
4:30
My Health, My Life is designed to help individuals who suffer from chronic illness learn simple techniques on how to live a healthy life
by managing their symptoms. This six-week program will help you…
5:00 pm My Health, My Life (6 Classes)
Memorial’s Classroom (A, B, or C)
Ends @
7:30
My Health, My Life is designed to help individuals who suffer from chronic illness learn simple techniques on how to live a healthy life
by managing their symptoms. This six-week program will help you…
6:00 pm Living with loss -8 week discussion based course
Harman Center
Ends @
7:00
Living with Loss:  An 8-week discussion-based course working through the book, Understanding Your Grief: Ten Essential Touchstones for Finding Hope and Healing Your Heart.
Wed
Oct 1
6:30 pm Childbirth Education 4-Week Series (Wednesdays, 3 of 4)
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
8:30
Class covers: what to expect during late pregnancy, labor delivery and postpartum. Learn relaxation and breathing techniques, comfort measures and discuss medication options for delivery. Please note:…
Thu
Oct 2
9:00 am Diabetes Wellness – Class 9 (am)
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
12:00
This Diabetes Wellness program is for patients who are newly diagnosed with diabetes, or those seeking to gain additional education to self manage their diabetes.  The class is delivered in 4 sessions…
1:00 pm Grief Recovery 8 week workshop
Cottage in the Meadow
Ends @
2:00
Grief Recovery Workshop:  An 8-week course centered around personal discovery and homework-style exercises designed to help you focus on grief recovery. This class utilizes the book The Grief Recovery…
3:00 pm Cottage in the Meadow tours
Cottage in the Meadow
Ends @
4:00
Tour Cottage in the Meadow and receive up to date information regarding the Hospice, Transitions and Cottage programs
6:00 pm Tomando Contro de su Salud/My Health, My Life (Orientacion y 6 clases)
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
8:30
My Health, My Life is designed to help individuals who suffer from chronic illness learn simple techniques on how to live a healthy life
by managing their symptoms. This six-week program will help you…
6:30 pm Parent to Parent Hispanic Social Sunnyside Ends @
8:00
Social will be held at the Family Engagement Center, 1901 E. Lincoln Ave. Sunnyside WA.

The Parent to Parent program offers emotional support and information to families raising children with special…

Fri
Oct 3
9:00 am Dealing with Change (am class)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
10:00
Dealing with Change – Reframe the way you think about change and discover its role in our growth, health, and happiness. Learn about how change affects your health and hear about some ways to positive…
11:00 am Dealing with Change (midday class)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
12:00
Dealing with Change – Reframe the way you think about change and discover its role in our growth, health, and happiness. Learn about how change affects your health and hear about some ways to positive…
2:30 pm Solo para mamografías—rayos X de senos.
‘Ohana Mammography Center
Ends @
4:30
Cuide de lo que verdaderamente es importante – su Salud.

¿No tiene cobertura médica?
‘Ohana tiene información de programas que ayudan a cubrir el costo de este importante examen.
Llame para más…

Walk-in Clinic for Screening Mammograms
‘Ohana Mammography Center
Ends @
5:30
`Ohana, Memorials Mammography center, offers a walk-in clinic for screening mammograms, Fridays, 2:30–5:30 p.m.  No appointment is necessary and interpreters are available. The name of the doctor who…
3:00 pm Dealing with Change (pm class)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
4:00
Dealing with Change – Reframe the way you think about change and discover its role in our growth, health, and happiness. Learn about how change affects your health and hear about some ways to positive…

Tip: Click  to add an event to your Yahoo!, Microsoft Outlook, MSN Hotmail, Apple iCal, or Google calendar.

Upcoming Events for October 5 – 11
Mon Oct 6 9:00 am Stress Management (am) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
10:00 am Mom and Baby Group (Memorial’s Community Education Center)
11:00 am Stress Management (midday class) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
11:30 am Lamplight Bible Study/support group (North Star Lodge)
1:30 pm LifeBio 101 (North Star Lodge)
2:00 pm Cancer Support Group (co-ed) (North Star Lodge)
3:00 pm Stress Management (pm class) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
4:00 pm Water’s Edge Chronic Pain Support Group (Lakeview)
6:00 pm Pre-natal Yoga (Memorial’s Community Education Center)
Tue Oct 7 8:00 am Diabetes Blood Sugar Screenings (Memorial Diabetes Prevention and Wellness)
12:00 pm North Star Knitters (North Star Lodge)
2:00 pm My Health, My Life (Orientation and 6 Classes) (Memorial’s Classroom (A, B, or C))
5:00 pm My Health, My Life (6 Classes) (Memorial’s Classroom (A, B, or C))
6:00 pm Living with loss -8 week discussion based course (Harman Center)
6:30 pm Valley Parents -Children’s Village (Children’s Village)
7:00 pm Diabetes Support Group (evening, June, July, August – no meetings) (Memorial’s Community Education Center)
Wed Oct 8 1:00 pm Better Breathers Club (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
6:30 pm Childbirth Education 4-Week Series (Wednesdays, 4 of 4) (Memorial’s Community Education Center)
Thu Oct 9 1:00 pm Diabetes Wellness – Class 10 (pm) (Memorial’s Community Education Center)
Grief Recovery 8 week workshop (Cottage in the Meadow)
6:00 pm Tomando Contro de su Salud/My Health, My Life (Orientacion y 6 clases) (Memorial’s Community Education Center)
Fri Oct 10 9:00 am Binational Health Week, Mammography screening New! (‘Ohana Mammography Center)
Simplify Your Life (am class) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
11:00 am Simplify Your Life (midday class) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
2:30 pm Solo para mamografías—rayos X de senos. (‘Ohana Mammography Center)
Walk-in Clinic for Screening Mammograms (‘Ohana Mammography Center)
3:00 pm Simplify Your Life (pm class) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)

View the entire calendar online

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Chikungunya—a painful mosquito-borne disease—hits United States

Sept. 27, 2014—It’s arrived: Chikungunya—an often painful and sometimes debilitating mosquito-borne disease caused by the chikungunya virus—has surfaced in the United States. While American chikungunya cases have until now occurred only in travelers who acquired it overseas—about 28 a year since 2006—the virus has now spread through mosquitoes in the United States.

Historically, chikungunya (pronounced chik-un-GUHN-ya) has been limited to countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Indian and Pacific Oceans. In late 2013, however, it was reported in the Caribbean for the first time.

So far this year, more than 1,000 people in the U.S. have contracted chikungunya while abroad, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). But since July, at least nine people have contracted the disease from mosquitos in Florida.

Due to outbreaks in the Caribbean and elsewhere, CDC expects that more American travelers will be infected. CDC cautioned that these imported cases could mean that the virus will spread further in the United States.

How it spreads

The chikungunya virus is spread by mosquitoes: After one bites someone who is infected, it passes the virus on to the next person it bites. Two species of mosquito carry the virus: Aedes aegypti, which is found in the southeastern United States and parts of the Southwest, and Aedes albopictus, found in the Southeast, East Coast, Mid-Atlantic and lower Midwest regions and parts of the Southwest. Both species bite mostly during the daytime.

Symptoms and treatment

Chikungunya’s most common symptoms are fever and severe joint pain, frequently in the hands and feet. While the virus is rarely fatal, it can cause headaches, rashes, muscle pain and swollen joints. Most people will feel better in a week, though joint pain can linger for months.

Although there is no vaccine or antiviral treatment for chikungunya, protection against mosquito bites can help stop the spread of the virus. If you have symptoms of chikungunya, tell your doctor—especially if you’ve recently traveled.

 

The take-home message
With no vaccine yet available—and the recent emergence of chikungunya in the United States—it’s more important than ever to protect yourself from mosquitoes. Avoiding a bite will not only keep you safe from chikungunya, but it can also protect you from other diseases mosquitoes can spread, such as the West Nile virus.

Here’s your best defense against bites, according to CDC:

Cover up. Headed outside? Then wear long-sleeved shirts, long pants and socks.

Use insect repellent on exposed skin and clothing. Choose a repellent with one of these active ingredients: DEET, picaridin, IR3535, para-menthane-diol or oil of lemon eucalyptus. Follow the instructions on the product. Do not use oil of lemon eucalyptus on children younger than 3 years old. Do not spray repellant on skin covered by clothing.

If you’re doubling up with insect repellent and sunscreen, apply the sunscreen first. Always follow the label instructions when using sunscreen.

Use permethrin on gear and clothes. Treat clothing, shoes and camping gear with certain products containing this repellant/insecticide. Treated items will repel and kill mosquitoes and ticks through several washings.

Mosquito-proof your home. Install screens on doors and windows to keep mosquitoes outside. Keep cool with air conditioning. You can help reduce the number of mosquitoes around your home by regularly emptying standing water from gutters, flowerpots, birdbaths and pool covers. To stay current on chikungunya developments in the United States, visit the CDC website for updates.

 

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Memorial’s Childbirth Education Classes

Having a baby changes everything, and it’s an especially difficult transition for families who are experiencing childbirth for the first time – or for teens who might be preparing for an unplanned pregnancy.

Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital offers a number of childbirth education classes to help women and their partners adjust during this special time in their lives. Women are encouraged to register for classes once they’ve reached the 25th week of pregnancy. Classes include basic childbirth education, baby basics, breast feeding and a boot camp for new dads.

Teresa Posada, Memorial’s childbirth education coordinator, talked about these classes Sept. 23, 2014 on KIT 1280.

  • Childbirth education classes teach you and your labor partner what to expect on the day you go into labor. From learning how to time contractions to what comfort measures you should use for labor, this class will give you the tools you need to help guide you through this journey.  Classes are also offered in Spanish.
  • Young and Pregnant Childbirth Education class designed especially for teen moms – If you are a teen who is pregnant and wanting more information on pregnancy and labor this class is for you. Our Young and Pregnant class is geared for the teen mom and a support person, and focuses not only on labor but on other issues that teens face when pregnant. Moms receive a free car seat upon completion of the class. Classes are offered in both English and Spanish.
  • Breastfeeding can be a special bonding time for you and your baby and is also the best nourishment you can give to him or her.  Our breastfeeding class can teach you how to get started and get through those first few weeks when breastfeeding can be most challenging.
  • There is a lot to know when it comes to taking care of an infant.  Our baby basics class teaches you all about baby care, diapering, swaddling, taking your baby’s temperature, bathing and more.
  • If you are a first time father, Boot Camp bootcampfornewdads.org may be just the class for you. This workshop will prepare you on how to support your partner, and you will learn how to engage with your new infant once he/she arrives. Boot Camp for New Dads gives you the confidence to go through the journey of becoming a dad.

Once your baby arrives, Memorial continues to offer you the support you may need.  Our Mom and Baby group meets every Monday from 10 am to noon where moms can bring their baby ages 0 to 12 months to connect with other moms and babies.  It is a great resource where you can ask parenting questions, hear from different presenters on many different topics relating to your child and to just feel connected.

These classes are designed for you to have a relatively more enjoyable labor, feel less stress about delivery and medical interventions, and ultimately feel empowered to handle just about any labor scenario that nature throws your way.  Couples who’ve had childbirth classes generally rate their childbirth experience as more satisfying overall than those who haven’t.

For more information, call Teresa Posada at 248-7322

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Measles is back in America, but there’s a simple solution | Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital

Sept. 25, 2014—The United States is experiencing its biggest surge of measles cases since the disease was declared to be eliminated from the country in 2000, reported the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

And the majority of those cases are among groups of unvaccinated people.

A virus on the go

Between Jan. 1 and Aug. 29 of 2014, 592 cases of measles were reported to CDC. That’s a huge jump: In the last 13 years, the yearly number of cases has climbed above 100 only four times, with the highest—in 2011, when there was an outbreak in France—just topping 200.

The majority of those cases are the result of foreign travel. In many parts of the world, measles is still common. Most of the cases this year are a result of an outbreak in the Philippines. It is all too easy for unvaccinated travelers to contract the highly contagious virus abroad and bring it to the United States, where it may continue to spread—which it does easily among communities of unvaccinated people.

Read the original report here.

The best protection

Measles spreads through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. It is so contagious, according to CDC, that one infected person will infect 90 percent of the people around him or her—unless those people are protected.

And vaccination—whether or not you plan to travel out of the country—is your best protection against measles.

Being vaccinated also helps to prevent the virus’s spread to vulnerable populations, such as infants too young to be vaccinated and people who cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons.

Make sure you and your family are up-to-date on the measles vaccine, which is typically delivered in two doses as part of the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) or measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (MMRV) vaccines.

If you’ve traveled abroad or have been around someone who is sick, keep an eye out for these telltale signs of a measles infection:

  • Initial fever followed by cough, runny nose and red eyes.
  • A rash of tiny red spots. The rash starts at the head and spreads to the rest of the body.

Measles is not without danger—it can cause death and serious complications, especially in children younger than 5 years and adults age 20 and older.

Think you know everything about vaccination—or want to know more? Test your knowledge with this vaccines quiz.

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New rules for prescribing Hydrocodone combination products

New rules for prescribing Hydrocodone combination products >>

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Yakima Childbirth Education Classes

media center now at memorial Yakima Childbirth Education Classes

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Stay safe from stomach bugs at the country fair

Make hand hygiene a priority!

Do your autumn plans include a trip to a country fair?  Spending a day at the fair is fun, but it’s important to make hand hygiene an important part of your day, especially if you will be coming into contact with certain animals.

E. coli O157:H7 infections are associated with animal contact at fairs, petting zoos, or animal exhibition halls. E. coli O157:H7 is commonly found in cattle, goats, and sheep. Outbreaks associated with these animals are common. People who contact these animals at any venue, public or private, are at risk for infection with E. coli O157:H7 as well as a variety of other germs including Salmonella and Campylobacter.

How germs are spread

People typically become ill by getting germs on their hands after touching the animals or contaminated surfaces, and then swallowing the germs while eating, drinking, or during other hand-to-mouth activities. Germs that can make you sick can be present on the fur, or in the saliva of the animals, in the soil where these animals are kept, or on surfaces such as fence railings of animal pens.

Signs and symptoms

Symptoms of E. coli O157:H7 illness typically include severe stomach cramps and diarrhea, often with bloody stools, but only a low-grade or no fever. People typically become ill 2 to 5 days after exposure, but this time period can range from 1 to at least 8 days. Most people recover in 5 to 10 days; however, E. coli O157:H7 infections sometimes lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a complication of E. coli that can lead to kidney failure. HUS most commonly affects children and the elderly. Diarrhea associated with an E. coli O157:H7 infection should NOT be treated with antibiotics, as this practice can promote the development of HUS.

How to prevent the risk of infection

Risk associated with animal contact can be reduced through the following measures:

  • Visitors to animal exhibits should be made aware that even healthy, well-tended animals can have germs that can make people seriously ill.
  • Food, drinks, and items that promote hand-to-mouth contact (for example, pacifiers) should not be brought into animal areas.
  • Hands should be washed with soap and water immediately after visiting the animals. Hand sanitizers are not a substitute for soap and running water but may afford some protection until soap and water are available. They do not work well against some germs and when hands are visibly soiled.

Children under 5 years of age, seniors, pregnant women, and people with chronic health conditions or a weakened immune system are at risk for serious complications from E. coli infections and should take extra care around animals.

*News alert courtesy of APIC (Association for Professionals in Infection Control) To learn more visit: http://www.apic.org/

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