Recall Alert: Foster Farms recalls chicken products

Foster Farms recalls chicken products | Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital.

July 8, 2014—Do you have chicken products sitting in your freezer? If you do, take note: Foster Farms is recalling some chicken products because they might be contaminated with salmonella, a bacteria that could make you and your family sick.

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Children’s Miracle Network Golf Tournament in Yakima

Kellie Connaughton of The Memorial Foundation appeared on KIT 1280 on July 1, 2014, to tout the upcoming Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals golf tournament. Connaughton and representatives of Solarity Credit Union, one of the tournament sponsors, discuss the importance of the tournament in supporting Children’s Miracle Network efforts in Central Washington.

As the Children’s Miracle Network hospital for Central Washington, Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital has the only Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in the region, as well as a Pediatric Unit. Memorial also partners with other community organizations to serve children with special health care needs at Children’s Village, which offers medical clinics, developmental evaluations, dental services, occupational and speech therapy, mental health counseling, educational services, care resource coordinators and physical therapy.  Visit Memorial online at yakimamemorial.org or on Facebook (www.facebook.com/yakimavalleymemorialhospital), Twitter (www.twitter.com/Yakima_Memorial) or Pinterest (www.pinterest.com/yvmh).

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The dangers of drug interactions

When people take more than one medication, or if they take other dietary or nutritional supplements in addition to their prescription or over-the-counter medication, drug interactions can occur. The risks are different for different people, based on age, any underlying diseases or conditions and lifestyle, but some drug interactions can be deadly.

Christopher Cook of Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital’s Pharmacy Department talked about the dangers of drug interactions July 8, 2014, during a live interview on KIT 1280.

How big a concern are drug interactions?

According to the Centers for Disease Control, roughly half of all Americans have taken a prescription drug in the past month. It is critical for anyone taking a drug to consider the potential for interaction with other substances in the body. Drugs can react to other medications, supplements and food or alcohol. These interactions can reduce or increase the effectiveness of drugs or lead to dangerous side effects.

What factors affect drug interactions?

There are some common factors – genetics, age, diet, exercise, current medications, any underlying diseases or conditions and the amount of time between the drugs being taken. However, some results can take weeks to develop.

What kinds of interactions are most common?

Drugs can interact with any other substances in the body.

  • Drug interactions with other drugs – Prescription drugs can interact not just with other prescription drugs, but also over-the-counter medications. Many over-the-counter medications are not as benign as some might believe.
  • Nutritional and herbal supplements – The FDA estimates that half of Americans regularly use dietary supplements, such as vitamins, minerals, amino acids and herbs or botanicals. Combining these supplements with drugs can cause serious adverse reactions.
  • Food and alcohol – Some medications are intended to be taken with food to prevent stomach interaction; other times, food can slow the body’s absorption of a medication. Some drugs can affect a person’s appetite and can interfere with the absorption of nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals.

How do I prevent these drug interactions?

People taking a prescription or over the counter medication should check with their physician or pharmacist to determine if there is a risk for adverse reactions. Three of the most commonly used prescription drug classes can result in a variety of drug interactions if patients are not aware of the risk and misuse them:

  • Antidepressants
  • Blood pressure medication
  • Cholesterol drugs

What are some common interactions with those drugs?

  • Antidepressants are known to interact with some antihistamines, causing extreme drowsiness, and with St. John’s wort, a dietary supplement used to treat depression.
  • Over-the-counter decongestants can decrease the effectiveness of blood-pressure medication.
  • Mixing cholesterol drugs with certain dietary supplements or foods can damage muscles.

To be safe, always check with your doctor or pharmacist before taking any medication or supplement.

 

Source: Centers for Disease Control, National Institutes of Health

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7th Annual Fiesta de Salud

fiesta 7th Annual Fiesta de Salud

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Safe Sitter Class August 11

safe sitter Safe Sitter Class August 11

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Healthy Smoothie in a Jar

smoothie Healthy Smoothie in a Jar

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Community Resources for those with advanced illness…

can we talk Community Resources for those with advanced illness...

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Where there’s wildfire, there’s health risk

Where there’s wildfire, there’s health risk | Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital.

Hot, dry weather increases the risk of wildfires. And smoke from wildfires can cause health problems—even if you’re not directly in the line of the fire. That’s why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report urging residents in areas affected by wildfire to stay alert and follow some simple precautions to decrease the risk of smoke-related illnesses.

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Shellfish-related illnesses can be prevented – important summer safety tips

Shellfish-related illnesses can be prevented – important summer safety tips
Courtesy of the WA State Dept of Health
OLYMPIA — Warm weather and low tides are good for harvesting shellfish, but nice weather is also ideal for naturally-occurring bacteria to multiply, raising the risk of illness. The Department of Health advises Washington’s shellfish consumers to follow summertime health advice as they head to area beaches to gather shellfish.

“Sunshine and warming waters are ideal conditions for the bacteria that cause vibriosis to multiply,” explains Jerrod Davis, director of the Office of Shellfish and Water Protection. “This raises the risk of getting sick from eating raw or undercooked shellfish – especially oysters.”

People who gather their own shellfish can follow simple tips to avoid getting ill. Make sure oysters are placed on ice or refrigerated immediately after they are picked. Harvest shellfish as the tide goes out and don’t take shellfish that have been exposed by the receding tide for more than an hour. Cook shellfish thoroughly, especially in the summer months, because the Vibrio parahaemolyticus bacteria are killed when shellfish have reached 145° F for 15 seconds. Don’t rinse cooked shellfish with seawater because it can be re-contaminated with Vibrio.

Vibriosis symptoms usually appear within 24 hours of eating infected shellfish and may include diarrhea, stomach cramps, nausea, vomiting, headache, fever, and chills. Symptoms typically last between two to seven days. People with lowered immunity, liver disease, stomach ulcers, or who take medication to reduce stomach acid are at higher risk for severe illness and should never eat raw or undercooked shellfish.

Not all shellfish illnesses can be prevented by cooking. Biotoxins are also found in Washington waters and are not destroyed by cooking. Always call the Shellfish Safety Hotline at 1-800-562-5632 or check the clickable map website at https://fortress.wa.gov/doh/eh/maps/biotoxin/biotoxin.html to learn about shellfish closures or health warnings.

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Heart disease, depression linked in young women

Heart disease, depression linked in young women | Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital.

Younger women with moderate to severe depression are more likely to also face heart problems, according to a study in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Click above to read more.

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