Gastroenterology Physician Jobs in Yakima

Job Details: Physician- Gastroenterology

an 300x229 Gastroenterology Physician Jobs in Yakima

Yakima Gastroenterology Associates is a dynamic, full service gastroenterology practice comprised of 8 gastroenterologists and 3 midlevel providers. Our beautiful 21,000sqft gastroenterology clinic is equipped with state of the art equipment and has an attached free-standing endoscopy center which is capable of doing 45 endoscopies per day. Over 11,000 procedures are completed annually (including ERCP, EUS, Colonoscopy and EGD). We receive over 730 new referrals on a monthly basis. This is an ideal opportunity for a physician that enjoys a stimulating practice environment with flexibility for doing all GI procedures. Enjoy a four day work week and a light call schedule. We offer competative compensation with comprehensive benefit package including malpractice, CME, Medical/Dental/Vision, LTD, Life/AD&D and more…

Requirements:

  • Completion of an Accredited Residency and Fellowship
  • BC/BE in Gastroenterology

Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital’s Family of Services

For more than 60 years, Memorial has provided and responded to the healthcare needs of the community.  Memorial has built a network of support encompassing primary health care and health education that’s second to none for a community of our size. As the region’s leading health care provider and Yakima’s largest employer, we believe that by improving health, we will transform Yakima.

Live the good life…

In the Yakima Valley community, you’ll discover abundant opportunities to enjoy a lifestyle that’s comparable to few other places.  It’s all here, in a climate with four beautiful seasons, 300 days of sunshine and blue skies.

You’ll find it ready-made for families with excellent public and private schools, thriving secondary educational facilities, and cultural breadth and diversity.

No matter what you do for fun, recreational opportunities are everywhere.  Downhill and cross country skiing, world-class fly fishing and gorgeous hiking trails are within an hour’s drive of Yakima.

Wines from Yakima Valley vineyards have developed an international reputation that rivals Napa Valley.  The region is becoming known as one of the finest wine-grape growing areas anywhere.

Seattle, Portland, and Spokane are only two to three hours away by car- close enough to enjoy without having to deal with a grid-locked life.

If you’re ready to live the good life, the Yakima Valley is the place to call home.

Dr. Gabriel Lascar talks about Cornerstone’s new clinic.

Memorial Cornerstone Medicine has been treating Yakima Valley patients for more than 30 years and has a rich history of serving this community. Cornerstone is excited to be located at a new clinic, designed to better serve patients. Dr. Gabriel Lascar appeared on KIT 1280 on Dec. 16, 2014, to talk more about the new clinic.

How has the patient population at Cornerstone changed?

Cornerstone’s patients tend to be older. It’s a population that tends to have many chronic conditions, and caring for these patients requires a great deal of “behind the scenes” coordination. As health care changes, we need to be better situated to address the needs of these patients, as well as those who require less coordination.

How will this clinic enable you to do that?

We are very excited to be moving to a new clinic that has been built to allow us to better serve our patients into the future. It’s a purpose-built facility – meaning that it is designed to better meet the needs of our patients. The design allows for services to be brought directly to the patient.

  • The building is all on one floor – no elevator and no stairs.
  • There’s more parking and close to a bus stop right outside.
  • The new clinic is all about convenience for our patients.  We literally counted the steps from the clinic entry to the exam room to minimize the number of steps a patient takes once they come into the clinic.  Patients will receive care that is integrated, more efficient and comfortable.
  • In patient satisfaction surveys, one frequent complaint we heard was that patients don’t like having to wait in crowded, noisy waiting rooms.  To address this, we downsized the space in the waiting rooms and created exam rooms that are 40 percent larger to accommodate wheelchairs, walkers and family members or caregivers. From the check-in process to check-out, all of the services will occur in the exam room.
  • In addition, there are additional on-site services to better serve patients.

What are some of the services that will be offered at the new clinic that patients currently don’t have?

Services being offered at the new clinic will include:

  • Full service retail pharmacy, including a drive-through pharmacy that serves Cornerstone patients
  • Anti-coagulation management clinic
  • Lab draw station
  • Dietitians on site
  • Behaviorist on site
  • Diabetes education program also on site.

Dutch Bros. Coffee of Yakima donates $1,723.85 to Children’s Village

On Friday we had the pleasure of meeting Chris Hodge, Regional Manager of Dutch Bros. who presented Children’s Village with a check for $1,723.85! These funds were raised on December 5th during Dutch Bros. annual “Buck for Kids Day.” For ever drink sold, they donated $1 to Children’s Village.   Thank you Dutch Bros. Coffee of Yakima and thank you to our community for drinking coffee AND supporting Children’s Village at the same time!

Dutch Bro Donation Dutch Bros. Coffee of Yakima donates $1,723.85 to Childrens Village

Also, Chris has  agreed to serve on the Parent to Parent Advisory Board. He is a huge supporter of Parent to Parent and is very excited to be a part of the board.

 

 

Hospice appreciated

Hospice appreciated – From the Yakima Herald
Elna Iseminger

To the editor — My husband recently passed away from Alzheimer’s disease. In September, he was referred to Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital’s Hospice team. I had no idea what to expect. Everyone was compassionate and worked hard to keep my husband comfortable in his final weeks and days.

I will be forever grateful for the care they provided that allowed me to keep him at home with me. Thanks so much.

9 out of 10 heavy drinkers don’t have alcoholism, says CDC

Dec. 15, 2014—Is drinking alcohol a health concern even among those who don’t experience alcoholism? Many people who engage in excessive drinking are not actually dependent on alcohol, suggests a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Despite not displaying signs and symptoms of alcoholism, these adults can still experience many negative health effects from drinking too much.

Apart from nonfatal health problems, CDC statistics show excessive drinking is responsible for 88,000 deaths in the United States every year.

About the study

CDC experts analyzed data for the 138,100 adults who completed the National Survey on Drug Use and Health in 2009, 2010 and 2011. The survey, which is nationally representative of U.S. residents, assessed drinking patterns as well as characteristics of alcohol dependence.

Nine out of 10 people who drink excessively—defined as women who weekly consume 8 or more drinks and men who weekly consume 15 or more drinks—did not meet the criteria for alcohol dependence.

Additional findings showed that:

  • Excessive drinking, binge drinking and alcohol dependence were most common among men and people of both sexes ages 18 to 24.
  • Binge drinking—defined as 4 or more drinks for women and 5 or more drinks for men in one occasion—was most common among those with annual family incomes of $75,000 or more.
  • Alcohol dependence was most common among those with annual family incomes of $25,000 or less.
  • Binge drinking was related to alcohol dependency: 10.5 percent of those who engage in binge drinking are alcohol-dependent, compared to 1.3 percent of those who do not binge drink. And 10.2 percent of people who drink excessively are alcohol-dependent.

The results, which can be read in Preventing Chronic Disease, highlight the need for increased screening and public health interventions to reduce excessive drinking.

The take-home message
Even adults who aren’t alcohol-dependent can put their health at risk by drinking too much. In the short term, excessive alcohol use can increase the likelihood of car crashes and injuries, alcohol poisoning, and risky sexual behavior. In the long term, drinking too much can lead to serious health problems such as cancer, heart disease and depression.

Overall, CDC estimates nearly 100,000 alcohol-related deaths occur each year in the United States. However, you can help to reduce alcohol’s negative effects by not drinking too much. To prevent excessive alcohol use:

  • Assess your drinking. Choose not to drink too much yourself. Help others do the same.
  • Don’t serve or provide alcohol to those who shouldn’t be drinking, like children and teens, as well as adults who have already had too much alcohol.
  • Discuss your drinking behavior with your doctor. If you think that you drink too much, ask for help.

To learn more about the definitions of excessive drinking—and its effect on health—check out this infographic.

 

Classes and Events This Week

Events for December 14 – 20
Mon
Dec 15
9:00 am Men, Women and Heart Disease (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
10:00
Men, Women and Heart Disease – Heart disease is not just a man’s disease.  Cardiac symptoms and treatment may be different between men and women.

Classes are one hour each, offered at 9 & 11 am…

10:00 am Mom and Baby Group
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
12:00
Bring your baby (up to 12 months old) and join other moms to discuss
parenting topics, postpartum health and safety and early intervention.
11:00 am Men, Women and Heart Disease (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
12:00
Men, Women and Heart Disease – Heart disease is not just a man’s disease.  Cardiac symptoms and treatment may be different between men and women.

Classes are one hour each, offered at 9 & 11 am…

11:30 am Lamplight Bible Study/support group
North Star Lodge
Ends @
1:30
Lamplight Bible Study is designed for cancer patients and their caregivers/family members. You will see how the Bible can help navigate through their cancer journey. Classes held every 1st and 3rd Mon…
3:00 pm Men, Women and Heart Disease (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
4:00
Men, Women and Heart Disease – Heart disease is not just a man’s disease.  Cardiac symptoms and treatment may be different between men and women.

Classes are one hour each, offered at 9 & 11 am…

6:00 pm Pre-natal Yoga
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
7:00
Pre-natal Yoga helps decrease tension, improve flexibility and
strength, prepare for the birthing process, and cultivate a connection
between mother and child. No Yoga experience necessary!  If you…
Tue
Dec 16
8:00 am Diabetes Blood Sugar Screenings
Memorial Diabetes Prevention and Wellness
Ends @
10:00
Diabetes Blood Sugar and Foot Screenings-For most accurate blood sugar screening results, do not eat or drink anything 8-12 hours prior to screening.
Screens are held at the Center for Diabetes…
12:00 pm North Star Knitters
North Star Lodge
Ends @
2:00
Cast on to this active, fun-loving group of knitters (many survivors) and learn to knit, crochet and teach others. All the yarn is provided and the laughs are free. Ask your oncologist or nurse about…
2:00 pm My Health, My Life (Orientation and 6 Classes)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
4:30
My Health, My Life is designed to help individuals who suffer from chronic illness learn simple techniques on how to live a healthy life
by managing their symptoms. This six-week program will help you…
5:30 pm Parent to Parent Hispanic Social Yakima Ends @
7:00
The Parent to Parent program offers emotional support and information to families raising children with special health or developmental needs. Events and classes hosted by Parent to Parent are free bu…
6:30 pm Boot Camp For New Dads
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
8:30
This is a program where veteran dads (experienced fathers who bring in their babies) orient rookies (fathers to be) on the realities of fatherhood. Topics covered: caring for new moms, importance of t…
Wed
Dec 17
9:00 am Exercise For Life (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
10:00
Exercise For Life – Learn more about the benefits of remaining physically active and exercising regularly.

Classes are one hour each, offered at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm at Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation…

11:00 am Exercise For Life (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
12:00
Exercise For Life – Learn more about the benefits of remaining physically active and exercising regularly.

Classes are one hour each, offered at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm at Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation…

2:00 pm Cancer Support Group (co-ed)
North Star Lodge
Ends @
3:00
Co-ed Support Group for cancer patients, families and caregivers on the first Monday and every third Wednesday of the month.
Topics may include diet, exercise, treatment side effects from…
3:00 pm Exercise For Life (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
4:00
Exercise For Life – Learn more about the benefits of remaining physically active and exercising regularly.

Classes are one hour each, offered at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm at Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation…

6:30 pm Baby Basics
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
9:00
Diapering, bathing, feeding; there’s so much involved with in caring for a newborn! Learn all the infant basics, what you can do to be organized and gain insight into recognizing baby’s “cues.”

Thu
Dec 18
12:00 pm Sound Sleep-Sound Rest -Intro and Full Session
North Star Lodge
Ends @
2:00
A cancer diagnosis can cause anxiety, stress and sometimes
depression for patients and their caregivers. There are natural
ways to combat these side effects and it’s something anyone
can learn.
An…
6:30 pm Yakima Autism Support Ends @
8:00
The Parent to Parent program offers emotional support and information to families raising children with special health or developmental needs. Events and classes hosted by Parent to Parent are free bu…
Fri
Dec 19
9:00 am Eating For Life (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
10:00
Eating For Life – Eating shouldn’t be a chore!  In this class, you will learn how to view eating in a positive and healthy way and walk away with a plan to help you achieve your goal..

Classes are…

Parent to Parent group Scrapbooking Ends @
11:00
The Parent to Parent program offers emotional support and information to families raising children with special health or developmental needs. Events and classes hosted by Parent to Parent are free bu…
11:00 am Eating For Life (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
12:00
Eating For Life – Eating shouldn’t be a chore!  In this class, you will learn how to view eating in a positive and healthy way and walk away with a plan to help you achieve your goal..

Classes are…

2:30 pm Solo para mamografías—rayos X de senos.
‘Ohana Mammography Center
Ends @
4:30
Cuide de lo que verdaderamente es importante – su Salud.

¿No tiene cobertura médica?
‘Ohana tiene información de programas que ayudan a cubrir el costo de este importante examen.
Llame para más…

Walk-in Clinic for Screening Mammograms
‘Ohana Mammography Center
Ends @
5:30
`Ohana, Memorials Mammography center, offers a walk-in clinic for screening mammograms, Fridays, 2:30–5:30 p.m.  No appointment is necessary and interpreters are available. The name of the doctor who…
3:00 pm Eating For Life (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
4:00
Eating For Life – Eating shouldn’t be a chore!  In this class, you will learn how to view eating in a positive and healthy way and walk away with a plan to help you achieve your goal..

Classes are…

Alzheimer’s Support Group
Memorial’s Classroom (A, B, or C)
Ends @
4:00
Meets third Friday of every month at 7:00 p.m.

Tip: Click  to add an event to your Yahoo!, Microsoft Outlook, MSN Hotmail, Apple iCal, or Google calendar.

Upcoming Events for December 21 – 27
Mon Dec 22 9:00 am Depression (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
11:00 am Depression (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
3:00 pm Depression (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
5:30 pm Grupo de Apoyo de Padre a Padre en Español (Children’s Village)
6:30 pm Valley Parents -Sunnyside support group
Tue Dec 23 8:00 am Diabetes Blood Sugar Screenings (Memorial Diabetes Prevention and Wellness)
12:00 pm North Star Knitters (North Star Lodge)
Wed Dec 24 9:00 am Appetite Control (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
11:00 am Appetite Control (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
3:00 pm Appetite Control (classes at 9 & 11 am and 3 pm) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)

View the entire calendar online

Coping with grief at the holidays

The holidays are coming around, and while they are a time of joy and celebration for many, they can be especially difficult for anyone who has experienced the loss of a loved one. There are some steps a grieving person can take to make the burden a little easier. Memorial Chaplain Laurie Oswalt and Julie Cicero of Memorial Home Health and Hospice offered tips for coping with grief and loss at the holiday season Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014, on KIT 1280.

  • Be honest with yourself and with others about what you’re feeling, about what you’re able to do and what you don’t feel like doing for yourself and for others.
    • Example: You think you should “be strong” and go to the holiday party. Your friend helps by giving you a ride, but once you’re there, you realize it’s not the best place for you and you’re stuck somewhere you’re not ready to be.
  • Traditions – Don’t feel like you have to have the holidays be the same as always out of respect for your lost loved one. Maybe it’s a year to simplify or make new traditions, out of respect for that person and those who are still here.
    • The flip side of that: people who want to throw everything out and start all new traditions, believing they are “ready to start fresh.” Often, they later wish they had held on to some things. Keeping some traditions may honor your lost loved one.

There also are a few things caregivers should keep in mind about grieving people.

 

  • Remember: Every person grieves differently, and at a different pace.
  • Manage your expectations.
    • Talk openly and honestly about what the grieving person would like.
    • Help that person with his or her own expectations and traditions.

Example: “How can I help you and also protect you from others who are eager to help you?”

 

A study once listed the 141 things we say to try to be helpful when someone loses a loved one, but it found that only 19 of those things are actually helpful.

  • Comments to avoid:

“I know just how you feel.” No, you don’t.

“He’s in a better place.” He’s not here.

 

  • Comments that might help:

“I have no idea what to say.” It’s honest.

“Do you want to talk about it?” You’re open to listening. Be prepared if the answer is no.

Say nothing. Give a hug, if it’s appropriate.

 

Sometimes, in wanting to help, we’re not particularly helpful. People rarely reach out to someone who says “Let me know if I can help.”

But, you could say, “I’m going to walk my dog, and I’ll walk your dog too.”

Or, “I’m going to bring you food. Is there something you don’t eat?”

 

I often tell people who are grieving to keep a pad and pen nearby, to jot down simple things they need as they think of them. So when someone asks if there’s anything they can do, they’re ready: “I’m out of milk.”

 

Frequently asked questions:

 

Are there bereavement services available in Yakima?

Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital offers a variety of classes and services on many diseases and medical challenges that are faced by our community, including bereavement services to help you cope with the loss of a loved one. In addition, Memorial’s “Can We Talk?” monthly speaker series focuses on end-of-life issues, from palliative care and hospice to grief and loss.

 

How do I find out more?

For more information about the “Can We Talk?” monthly speaker series or other bereavement services at Memorial, visit our website at yakimamemorial.org or call 575-8035.

 

 

 

 

 

Signs point to fierce flu season, experts say

Dec. 11, 2014—The 2014–15 flu season is just getting underway, and experts say it could be more severe than usual. That makes vaccinations and other flu-fighting measures particularly important this year.

“We continue to recommend flu vaccine as the single best way to protect yourself against the flu,” said Tom Frieden, MD, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

One reason for concern is that the most common flu strain found so far this year is a type called influenza A H3N2. Often, when these types of viruses lead the way, flu-related hospitalizations and deaths go up, according to CDC.

In addition, about half of the H3N2 viruses analyzed so far have changed—or drifted—to the point that the vaccine available this year is not entirely effective against it.

But that’s no reason to avoid the flu shot or nasal spray vaccine, experts say. For one thing, the vaccine is designed to protect against 3 or 4 different flu viruses. Even if H3N2 protection is less than ideal, the vaccine still helps prevent illnesses caused by other flu strains.

If vaccination doesn’t prevent the flu altogether, it still may help lessen the severity of the illness, even for those who get the H3N2 variety.

Second line of defense

While vaccines help prevent the flu, antiviral medicines are available to help people who do become infected. These drugs can shorten the duration of the illness and limit its severity, according to CDC.

Antiviral medication can be especially helpful for those at highest risk for flu complications. That includes young children; people 65 and older; and those with ongoing health conditions, such as asthma, heart disease or diabetes.

These drugs are most effective when given within 48 hours of getting sick. If you think you may have the flu, call your doctor right away. Symptoms can include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, chills, and fatigue.
The take-home message

During National Influenza Vaccination Week, Dec. 7 through 13, CDC is reminding people there is still time to get a flu shot or nasal spray. But there is more you can do to protect yourself—and others—from the flu. For instance:

Avoid close contact with people who are sick. And stay home and away from others if you get sick.
Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze.
Wash your hands often. If soap and water are unavailable, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Don’t touch your eyes, nose or mouth unless your hands are clean.
Disinfect surfaces that may harbor germs at home, work or school.
Get plenty or rest and exercise, and eat nutritious food to stay in good health.

More than 1 in 5 teens still use tobacco, says CDC

Dec. 10, 2014—Cigarette smoking among teens has decreased in recent years, but tobacco still remains a problem among American youth. In fact, new findings from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that use of some noncigarette tobacco products has increased. Overall, an estimated 5.6 million kids are at risk for dying prematurely from a smoking-related disease.

About the study

CDC analyzed data from the 2013 Youth Tobacco Survey, a cross-sectional, self-administered questionnaire given to over 18,000 middle and high school students. In the survey, nearly 23 percent of high school students and 7 percent of middle school students reported using a tobacco product within the last 30 days. Nearly half of all high school students and 17 percent of middle school students say they’ve used a tobacco product within their lifetime.

Combustible tobacco products were noted as the most popular among youths, including use of cigarettes, cigars, pipes and hookahs. Almost 5 percent of high schoolers and slightly more than 1 percent of middle schoolers reported using e-cigarettes within the last 30 days.

According to the U.S. Surgeon General, 1/3 of youth who continue smoking into adulthood will die about 13 years earlier than their nonsmoking peers. The findings suggest that continued efforts—such as youth-focused media campaigns and higher product pricing—are needed to discourage tobacco use among tweens and teens to protect their health into adulthood.

Learn more about the data in the Morbitity and Mortality Weekly Report from CDC.

The take-home message
Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death and disease in America, according to CDC. And though most young people believe that they’ll be able to quit smoking, CDC estimates roughly 3 out of 4 high school smokers will continue smoking into adulthood.

Parents play an important role in helping children make healthy choices about tobacco use. Here’s what you can do to help yours:

  • Share the facts. Talk with your child about the health effects associated with tobacco use and how difficult it is to quit using tobacco once you’ve started.
  • State your expectations. Make it clear that tobacco use is not acceptable.
  • Offer help. If your child is already using tobacco, help him or her quit.
  • Maintain awareness. Know what your child is doing and with whom he or she spends time.
  • Work with others. Network with other parents to help your kids refuse tobacco. Encourage your child’s school to enforce tobacco-free policies for students, faculty and staff.
  • Set a good example. Avoid using tobacco. If you use tobacco, there are many tips that can help you quit.