Stay safe from stomach bugs at the country fair

Make hand hygiene a priority!

Do your autumn plans include a trip to a country fair?  Spending a day at the fair is fun, but it’s important to make hand hygiene an important part of your day, especially if you will be coming into contact with certain animals.

E. coli O157:H7 infections are associated with animal contact at fairs, petting zoos, or animal exhibition halls. E. coli O157:H7 is commonly found in cattle, goats, and sheep. Outbreaks associated with these animals are common. People who contact these animals at any venue, public or private, are at risk for infection with E. coli O157:H7 as well as a variety of other germs including Salmonella and Campylobacter.

How germs are spread

People typically become ill by getting germs on their hands after touching the animals or contaminated surfaces, and then swallowing the germs while eating, drinking, or during other hand-to-mouth activities. Germs that can make you sick can be present on the fur, or in the saliva of the animals, in the soil where these animals are kept, or on surfaces such as fence railings of animal pens.

Signs and symptoms

Symptoms of E. coli O157:H7 illness typically include severe stomach cramps and diarrhea, often with bloody stools, but only a low-grade or no fever. People typically become ill 2 to 5 days after exposure, but this time period can range from 1 to at least 8 days. Most people recover in 5 to 10 days; however, E. coli O157:H7 infections sometimes lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a complication of E. coli that can lead to kidney failure. HUS most commonly affects children and the elderly. Diarrhea associated with an E. coli O157:H7 infection should NOT be treated with antibiotics, as this practice can promote the development of HUS.

How to prevent the risk of infection

Risk associated with animal contact can be reduced through the following measures:

  • Visitors to animal exhibits should be made aware that even healthy, well-tended animals can have germs that can make people seriously ill.
  • Food, drinks, and items that promote hand-to-mouth contact (for example, pacifiers) should not be brought into animal areas.
  • Hands should be washed with soap and water immediately after visiting the animals. Hand sanitizers are not a substitute for soap and running water but may afford some protection until soap and water are available. They do not work well against some germs and when hands are visibly soiled.

Children under 5 years of age, seniors, pregnant women, and people with chronic health conditions or a weakened immune system are at risk for serious complications from E. coli infections and should take extra care around animals.

*News alert courtesy of APIC (Association for Professionals in Infection Control) To learn more visit: http://www.apic.org/

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Classes and Events This Week

Events for September 21 – 27
Sun
Sep 21
1:00 pm Cancelled: Childbirth Education, Sunday 2-day class (Day 2)
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
5:00
Class covers: what to expect during late pregnancy, labor delivery and postpartum. Learn relaxation and breathing techniques, comfort measures and discuss medication options for delivery. Please note:…
Mon
Sep 22
9:00 am Heart Failure (am class)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
10:00
Heart Failure – What causes heart failure? How is it managed?  In this class, we will define heart failure and learn how to manage it by focusing on nutrition, weight, stress, sleep, medications and e…
10:00 am Mom and Baby Group
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
12:00
Bring your baby (up to 12 months old) and join other moms to discuss
parenting topics, postpartum health and safety and early intervention.
11:00 am Heart Failure (midday class)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
12:00
Heart Failure – What causes heart failure? How is it managed?  In this class, we will define heart failure and learn how to manage it by focusing on nutrition, weight, stress, sleep, medications and e…
1:30 pm LifeBio 101
North Star Lodge
Ends @
3:30
LifeBio 101

This class teaches you how to use the writing process to address the emotions that accompany the life-altering experience of a cancer diagnosis. LifeBio Guide, Sue Karstetter, Psy.D., wil…

3:00 pm Heart Failure (pm class)
Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness
Ends @
4:00
Heart Failure – What causes heart failure? How is it managed?  In this class, we will define heart failure and learn how to manage it by focusing on nutrition, weight, stress, sleep, medications and e…
5:30 pm Parent to Parent Hispanic Social Yakima Ends @
7:00
The Parent to Parent program offers emotional support and information to families raising children with special health or developmental needs. Events and classes hosted by Parent to Parent are free bu…
6:00 pm Pre-natal Yoga
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
7:00
Pre-natal Yoga helps decrease tension, improve flexibility and
strength, prepare for the birthing process, and cultivate a connection
between mother and child. No Yoga experience necessary!  If you…
6:30 pm Valley Parents -Sunnyside support group Ends @
8:00
The Parent to Parent program offers emotional support and information to families raising children with special health or developmental needs. Events and classes hosted by Parent to Parent are free bu…
Tue
Sep 23
8:00 am Diabetes Blood Sugar Screenings
Memorial Diabetes Prevention and Wellness
Ends @
10:00
Diabetes Blood Sugar and Foot Screenings-For most accurate blood sugar screening results, do not eat or drink anything 8-12 hours prior to screening.
Screens are held at the Center for Diabetes…
12:00 pm North Star Knitters
North Star Lodge
Ends @
2:00
Cast on to this active, fun-loving group of knitters (many survivors) and learn to knit, crochet and teach others. All the yarn is provided and the laughs are free. Ask your oncologist or nurse about…
2:00 pm My Health, My Life (Orientation and 6 Classes)
Memorial’s Classroom (A, B, or C)
Ends @
4:30
My Health, My Life is designed to help individuals who suffer from chronic illness learn simple techniques on how to live a healthy life
by managing their symptoms. This six-week program will help you…
4:30 pm Aprendiendo a Vivir con su Diabetes-Clase de diabetes en español
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
7:30
Aprendiendo a Vivir con su Diabetes-Clase de diabetes en español

Las clases son ofrecidas cada cuarto jueves del mes en En el Centro de Educación del Hospital Memorial Ubicado en el 2506 al Oeste de…

5:00 pm My Health, My Life (6 Classes)
Memorial’s Classroom (A, B, or C)
Ends @
7:30
My Health, My Life is designed to help individuals who suffer from chronic illness learn simple techniques on how to live a healthy life
by managing their symptoms. This six-week program will help you…
6:00 pm Living with loss -8 week discussion based course
Harman Center
Ends @
7:00
Living with Loss:  An 8-week discussion-based course working through the book, Understanding Your Grief: Ten Essential Touchstones for Finding Hope and Healing Your Heart.
6:30 pm Baby Basics
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
9:00
Diapering, bathing, feeding; there’s so much involved with in caring for a newborn! Learn all the infant basics, what you can do to be organized and gain insight into recognizing baby’s “cues.”

Wed
Sep 24
6:30 pm Childbirth Education 4-Week Series (Wednesdays, 2 of 4)
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
8:30
Class covers: what to expect during late pregnancy, labor delivery and postpartum. Learn relaxation and breathing techniques, comfort measures and discuss medication options for delivery. Please note:…
Thu
Sep 25
8:30 am Grown Up Drivers’ Education (Class 1 of 2)
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
12:00
Completion of this course may entitle you to a reduction for your auto insurance for those over 55.

Class is coordinated by Ava Grajeda-Allard at State Farm Insurance.

1:00 pm Grief Recovery 8 week workshop
Cottage in the Meadow
Ends @
2:00
Grief Recovery Workshop:  An 8-week course centered around personal discovery and homework-style exercises designed to help you focus on grief recovery. This class utilizes the book The Grief Recovery…
6:00 pm Spanish Breastfeeding-Clases para dar Pecho Exitosamente
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
8:30
If you plan to breastfeed you’ll be giving your baby a healthy head start. Before your baby arrives give yourself a head start by learning helpful breastfeeding techniques and solutions for common bre…
Tomando Contro de su Salud/My Health, My Life (Orientacion y 6 clases)
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
8:30
My Health, My Life is designed to help individuals who suffer from chronic illness learn simple techniques on how to live a healthy life
by managing their symptoms. This six-week program will help you…
Family Support Group for Type 1 Diabetes
Children’s Village
Ends @
7:30
New support group for families dealing with Type1 Diabetes.

Meets the last Thursdayof each month at 6:00pm at Children’s Village
3801 Kern Road, Yakima

All are welcome!

Please contact Abbie at 952-9725…

Fri
Sep 26
8:30 am Grown Up Drivers’ Education (Class 2 of 2)
Memorial’s Community Education Center
Ends @
12:00
Completion of this course may entitle you to a reduction for your auto insurance for those over 55.

Class is coordinated by Ava Grajeda-Allard at State Farm Insurance.

2:30 pm Solo para mamografías—rayos X de senos.
‘Ohana Mammography Center
Ends @
4:30
Cuide de lo que verdaderamente es importante – su Salud.

¿No tiene cobertura médica?
‘Ohana tiene información de programas que ayudan a cubrir el costo de este importante examen.
Llame para más…

Walk-in Clinic for Screening Mammograms
‘Ohana Mammography Center
Ends @
5:30
`Ohana, Memorials Mammography center, offers a walk-in clinic for screening mammograms, Fridays, 2:30–5:30 p.m.  No appointment is necessary and interpreters are available. The name of the doctor who…
Sat
Sep 27
10:00 am Young and Pregnant Teen Childbirth Program
Memorial’s Classroom (A, B, or C)
Ends @
3:30
Memorial Hospital’s Young and Pregnant Childbirth Class is specially designed for individuals who are 19 and younger, and their partners (boyfriend, husband, sister, mom or friend), who want informati…

Tip: Click  to add an event to your Yahoo!, Microsoft Outlook, MSN Hotmail, Apple iCal, or Google calendar.

Upcoming Events for September 28 – October 4
Mon Sep 29 9:00 am Label Reading (am class) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
10:00 am Mom and Baby Group (Memorial’s Community Education Center)
11:00 am Label Reading (midday class) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
1:30 pm LifeBio 101 (North Star Lodge)
3:00 pm Label Reading (pm class) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
4:00 pm Diabetes Prevention Program orientation (Memorial’s Community Education Center)
6:00 pm Pre-natal Yoga (Memorial’s Community Education Center)
Tue Sep 30 8:00 am Diabetes Blood Sugar Screenings (Memorial Diabetes Prevention and Wellness)
12:00 pm North Star Knitters (North Star Lodge)
2:00 pm My Health, My Life (Orientation and 6 Classes) (Memorial’s Classroom (A, B, or C))
5:00 pm My Health, My Life (6 Classes) (Memorial’s Classroom (A, B, or C))
6:00 pm Living with loss -8 week discussion based course (Harman Center)
Wed Oct 1 6:30 pm Childbirth Education 4-Week Series (Wednesdays, 3 of 4) (Memorial’s Community Education Center)
Thu Oct 2 9:00 am Diabetes Wellness – Class 9 (am) (Memorial’s Community Education Center)
1:00 pm Grief Recovery 8 week workshop (Cottage in the Meadow)
3:00 pm Cottage in the Meadow tours (Cottage in the Meadow)
6:00 pm Tomando Contro de su Salud/My Health, My Life (Orientacion y 6 clases) (Memorial’s Community Education Center)
6:30 pm Parent to Parent Hispanic Social Sunnyside
Fri Oct 3 9:00 am Dealing with Change (am class) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
11:00 am Dealing with Change (midday class) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)
2:30 pm Solo para mamografías—rayos X de senos. (‘Ohana Mammography Center)
Walk-in Clinic for Screening Mammograms (‘Ohana Mammography Center)
3:00 pm Dealing with Change (pm class) (Memorial Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness)

View the entire calendar online

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Drugs like Xanax & Valium may increase Alzheimer risk by 51 percent

Sept. 22, 2014—Up to 43 percent of older adults turn to benzodiazepines, including Valium and Xanax, to treat anxiety, depression and insomnia. And while the drugs are already known to affect memory and cognition, a new study suggested that benzodiazepines could also raise the risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease.

About the study

Researchers analyzed data on nearly 9,000 adults over age 66, including 1,796 with Alzheimer’s disease. Roughly half of those with Alzheimer’s disease had taken benzodiazepines in the 5 to 10 years preceding their diagnosis. Forty percent of those without Alzheimer’s disease had used them in the same period. Overall, those who’d taken the meds were up to 43 percent to 51 percent more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than those who hadn’t.

The relationship appeared to be dose-dependent. While participants who took benzodiazepines for fewer than 90 days had the same Alzheimer’s risk as those who’d never used them at all, the risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease increased with exposure. The risk was greater for those who took them for more than six months than it was for those who took them for between three and six months. Using long-acting medications, too, was found to be riskier than using short-acting ones.

Despite the evidence, researchers couldn’t rule out an alternative theory that benzodiazepine use might be an early marker of dementia rather than a cause. Benzodiazepines are often prescribed to treat anxiety or sleep disorders in older adults, symptoms that may be associated with heightened risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

Still, the findings reinforce the suspicion that long-term benzodiazepine users may be at an increased likelihood for developing Alzheimer’s disease. While the drugs remain valuable short-term tools for treating anxiety and insomnia, the researchers recommend that health care providers carefully consider the benefits and risks associated with benzodiazepines before prescribing them to older patients.

Read the study, published in the BMJ, here.

 

The take-home message
Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia, a decline in mental function caused by damage to brain cells. While risk factors like age and genetics can’t be changed, you may be able to reduce your risk by keeping your heart healthy, exercising regularly and eating a Mediterranean-style diet.Growing evidence also suggests that benzodiazepines, a class of medication known to affect memory and cognition, could also play a role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Long-term use and long-acting drugs may be riskier than short-term use or short-acting drugs. If you or an adult you know is thinking about taking benzodiazepines to cope with a chronic problem, it’s important to weigh the pros and cons with a health care provider.

Symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease can vary greatly. However, it’s important to be familiar with common warning signs, such as:

  • Memory loss or confusion that disrupts daily life
  • Trouble planning or solving problems
  • Difficulty completing familiar tasks

If you begin to notice these symptoms in yourself or an older adult, consult a doctor. Early diagnosis offers the best opportunities for treatment, support and planning for the future.

Loss of memory and brain function are the most common signs of Alzheimer’s, but there are other symptoms. You can learn about diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer’s here.

 

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Dueling diets: Which one takes off the most weight?

Sept. 20, 2014—Atkins. Jenny Craig. Weight Watchers. Zone. When it comes to name-brand diet plans, the question on many people’s minds is, “Which one works best?”

A group of researchers decided to find out, and their results were published in September in The Journal of the American Medical Association.

The answer? Drum roll, please!

The diet plan that works best is the one that you’re most likely to stick with, and all of them were found to be better than no diet plan.

Branded diets go head-to-head

Researchers searched six medical databases for studies that put overweight or obese participants on different name-brand diets and tracked the people’s weight loss at 6 months and 12 months. The final analysis included 48 clinical trials, involving a total of 7,286 adults.

Low-carbohydrate diets included Atkins and Zone. Low-fat diets included Rosemary Conley and (Dr. Dean) Ornish. Diets that moderately restricted carbohydrates, fats and proteins included Jenny Craig, Volumetrics and Weight Watchers.

Researchers compared the weight-loss results of each diet plan to those of control diets (which they termed “no diet”). In the end, the Ornish, Rosemary Conley, Jenny Craig and Atkins diet plans compared most favorably to no diet after 12 months, with an average weight loss of about 14 pounds. However, that was only slightly better than results from Zone, Weight Watchers and Volumetrics—which averaged a little more than 13 pounds.

In other words, the diets were much the same in terms of the total amount of weight people might lose after one year. Researchers concluded that the differences were so slight that the best diet for any person is the one he or she will stick to.

You can read more about the study here.

The take-home message
You can lose a significant amount of weight on any of these diets—but only if you stick to it, the authors wrote. So the ideal diet for you is the one you can stay on.

The key to losing weight is to burn more calories than you eat and drink. It might be easier for you to do that by eating fewer carbs, eating fewer fats or eating less of both.

Of course, you don’t have to follow a name-brand diet plan. Here are three tips from the Weight-control Information Network, a service of the National Institutes of Health, that can help you design your own healthy diet:

  • Emphasize healthy foods. Fill at least half of every plate with fruits and vegetables.
  • Eat small portions. Read the nutrition facts label on foods so you know the size of one serving.
  • Be physically active every day. Schedule a walk or bicycle ride after every lunch or dinner, for example.

If you need more help on pulling together a good diet or you need more advice on losing weight in a healthful manner, visit your doctor.

 

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Take steps to protect children against illness

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  

Contact: Shannon Dininny, Memorial Communications, (509) 577-5051

Take steps to protect children against illness

Sept. 17, 2014

Some Washington children are experiencing symptoms of severe respiratory illness. Health officials are investigating whether these symptoms may be tied to a virus known as Enterovirus D68, or EV-D68. There are no confirmed cases of EV-D68 in the state, but parents can take steps to help protect their children against respiratory illness.

To prevent EV-D68 and other respiratory illness, wash hands with soap and water, because hand sanitizers are not as effective against viruses. Cover your mouth when you cough. Stay home if you are sick, and keep children home when they are sick. You also should regularly disinfect some areas in your home, such as countertops, door knobs and your children’s toys.

Mild symptoms of EV-D68 include fever, runny nose, sneezing, cough and body and muscle aches. More severe symptoms include shortness of breath and difficulty breathing. Children with asthma are more susceptible to the virus; parents of children with asthma should make sure they are current on medications and have an updated asthma care plan.

Contact your doctor, or consider visiting the emergency room, if your child is having difficulty breathing, such as audible wheezing or signs of distress and fear as they try to take a breath.

For more information, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control website at www.cdc.gov.

###

ANUNCIO DE SERVICIO PÚBLICO- PARA SU PUBLICACION INMEDIATA

CONTACTO: Shannon Dininny, Memorial Communications, (509) 577-5051

Tome medidas preventivas para proteger a los niños de enfermedades

Septiembre 17 del 2014

Algunos niños de Washington están experimentando síntomas de una severa enfermedad respiratoria. Los oficiales de salud están investigando si estos síntomas podrían están relacionados a un virus conocido como el Enterovirus D68 o EV-D68. No hay casos confirmados de EV-D68 en el estado, pero los padres de familia pueden tomar precaución para proteger a sus niños de enfermedades respiratorias.

Para prevenir el  EV-D68 y otras enfermedades respiratorias, lávese las manos con agua y jabón, porque el desinfectante para manos no es tan efectivo contras los virus. Cúbrase su boca cuando tosa. Quédese en casa si esta enfermo y mantenga sus niños en casa cuando estén enfermos. También deberá usar desinfectante regularmente en algunas áreas de su casa, como los bancos o mostradores, agarraderas de las puertas y los juguetes de sus niños.

Síntomas moderados del EV-D68 incluyen fiebre, secreción nasal, estornudos, tos y dolor muscular. Síntomas mas severos incluyen respiración corta y dificultad para respirar, los niños con asma son más susceptibles a este virus; los padres de niños con asma deben  asegurarse que sus niños están al corriente con sus medicamentos y que tienen un plan actualizado para el cuidado del asma.

Contacte al medico o considere visitar la sala de emergencia si su niño tiene dificultad para respirar, como sibilancias (ruido similar a un silbido al respirar) o signos de distres (ansiedad) y miedo cuando están tratando de respirar.

 

Para mas información  visite el Centro para el control de enfermedades del los Estados Unidos en el www.cdc.gov.

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GIFT SHOP SALE! 9/24 – 9/26

Customer Appreciation Days!!

Come in to The Gift Shop at Memorial for complimentary cookies and enter to win a gourmet gift bag valued at $25!

20% off MOST ITEMS!

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Infographic: Healthy shopping on a budget

Infographic: Healthy shopping on a budget | Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital.

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When cyberbullying hurts, family dinners can help

Sept. 16, 2014—Cyberbullying might not involve getting pantsed in the locker room—kids bullied online might be forced to deal with nasty messages, embarrassing pictures or fake profiles instead. But cyberbullying can feel just as devastating for kids. And while there’s no simple way to erase virtual harassment completely, new research suggests that family dinners can help picked-on adolescents cope.

About the study

To find out whether family contact helps kids who have been cyberbullied, researchers analyzed survey data on nearly 19,000 students aged 12 to 18. Nearly a fifth of adolescents surveyed reported experiencing some form of cyberbullying within the past 12 months—and it affected them in several ways. Compared to kids who weren’t picked on, cyberbullied tweens and teens were more likely to experience mental health problems like anxiety, depression or self-harm; more likely to engage in fighting or vandalism; and more likely to drink alcohol or abuse drugs.

But amidst the troubling findings, there was some good news. Among cyberbullied kids, those who regularly ate dinner with their families were less susceptible to virtual harassment’s harmful effects. The findings suggest that family contact and communication can make bullying less difficult for adolescents to deal with.

Read a summary of the study, published in JAMA Pediatrics, here.

The take-home message
Cyberbullying can harm kids’ self-esteem and health, which can lead to things like poor grades, skipping school, and drug and alcohol use. But the close contact and communication that come from family dinners appear to help cyberbullied kids cope better.

What’s more, teaching all adolescents about responsible texting and Internet use—as well as monitoring their virtual communications closely—can also make a difference. Here’s what parents should know:

  • Get smart about social media. Learn which platforms your child uses, and learn how to use them. Have profiles on each, and make a policy that you and your child have to friend or follow each other.
  • Emphasize that the Internet is permanent. Remind your child to avoid sending texts or posts that could be hurtful or embarrassing, since posts can’t always be erased, and they can quickly be shared with anyone in the world.
  • Establish rules about technology use. Set time limits for social media and Internet use, and be clear about what your child is and isn’t allowed to do online.
  • Ask about your child’s online activities. Use social media as a springboard to ask what your child has been up to. What was posted today? Who sent text messages?
  • Monitor activity. Tell your child that you’ll periodically check text logs and social media posts, and be sure to follow through.

Finally, know the signs that could indicate trouble. If you notice that your child is skipping activities in favor of social media, having trouble in school or experiencing other issues due to spending too much time online, talk about it openly, first with your child and then with your child’s pediatrician. Teachers and administrators may also need to get involved if your child is being bullied online and that activity breaks school policy.

Bullying could harm your child’s long-term health—learn what you can do to stop it here.

 

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Infographic: 5 steps to clean hands

Infographic: 5 steps to clean hands | Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital.

Keeping your hands clean is one of the best ways to prevent the spread of infection and illness.

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Workplace stress and diabetes linked in new study

Sept. 15, 2014—Feeling frazzled at work might do more than sour your mood. A high-stress job might also make you prone to diabetes, said a study published in Psychosomatic Medicine.

It found that people under high pressure at work were 45 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes—the most common form of the disease—than those without taxing jobs.

Multiple risk factors, such as extra pounds, contribute to type 2 diabetes risk, but researchers found that work-related stress significantly raised diabetes risk regardless of factors like weight, age and family history. That finding makes this study a little unusual, and it might prompt you to make some changes in the way you handle stresses that come from work.

About the study

Researchers tracked 5,337 employed men and women ages 29 to 66, none of whom had diabetes at the study’s start.

The researchers quizzed the adults about stress at work. For the purposes of the study, they defined a high-stress job as one that required employees to handle huge demands while having little control over their tasks.

Researchers also factored in the adults’ body mass index (BMI), age, sex and family history of diabetes.

After an average of 12.7 years of follow up, 291 people developed type 2 diabetes, and work-related job stress emerged as a major risk factor for a diabetes diagnosis. Researchers say that bump in risk worked independently of other classic risk factors, including obesity and advancing age.

Past research has uncovered a link between workplace stress and heart disease. But this is the first study to reveal a strong association between high-pressure jobs and type 2 diabetes, according to a press release announcing the study’s results.

Read more about the study here.

The take-home message
Some stress at work is inevitable—even dream jobs have it—and it can even be motivating. Still, since research now links high-stress jobs to diabetes as well as heart disease, it’s clearly in your best interest to keep workplace stress to a manageable level.

So if your job is a high-stress one, how can you feel less tense? Try these tips from the American Diabetes Association, the American Psychological Association and the Office on Women’s Health:

Make the most of breaks. Even 10 minutes of personal time can refresh you. Take a quick walk—exercise is a stress buster—or chat with a co-worker about something that has nothing to do with work.

Set reasonable standards. Don’t expect perfection from yourself or others. Everybody falls short at times.

Learn how to relax. Stretching and relaxing your muscles can tame tension. So can breathing deeply for at least five minutes.

Establish boundaries. You might stop answering job-related email at home or answering work calls during dinner.

Perhaps most important, develop healthy responses to stress. Rather than overeating or reaching for a cigarette, for example, do your best to stick to smart habits. Take extra care to eat well, exercise regularly and get enough shut-eye.

Many types of stress can affect your health. Find out what they are here.

 

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