The Church Blues

Laurie Oswalt “We had a memorial service for my loved one in our church, and now I don’t want to go there.”

Your loved one dies, you do all you can to participate in preparing a service that honors your loved one, you have the service at your church, and now you can’t seem to darken the doors to that sanctuary.

The longer you wait, the tougher it will be.

A friend of mine was killed in a car accident at an intersection in the middle of town. I used to drive through that intersection every day for years…until the accident, that is.  After that, I avoided it for weeks.

Weeks became months. And months became an entire year.

Finally, I recognized that I was literally going out of my way, adding minutes to my drive time, simply so I wouldn’t have to deal with the emotion of crossing that intersection and recalling that terrible day. I finally decided that I wasn’t going to let it get the best of me. So I revved the engine, headed for the intersection, and met it head-on. I drove right through it with no repurcussions (maybe I thought that I might get into an accident, too), and I’ve been driving through it every day since.

And it’s simply some asphalt on the ground.

A church or a chapel is something with substantially more meaning. If you have a memorial or funeral service at your regular place of worship, head back to that sanctuary as soon as possible after the service, so your last—and lasting—memory will be a sense of peace, not a sense of loss. If it has been some time since you’ve been able to step foot in the doorway, try taking a friend with you on a day when others are not around. Walk into the area of worship. Walk around and look at what is on the wall, what is in the front, what is above you. Try to encourage yourself to find snippits of comfort and peace in this sacred space…so it can become sacred to you once again.

 

Health benefits of Curcumin

Spice up your health with curcumin!

Carli Hill RD, CSO, CD

If you haven’t heard of curcumin before, perhaps you are familiar with turmeric. Curcumin is actually one of the most active phytochemicals found in turmeric. Currently, curcumin is being studied to determine effect on arthritis, cholesterol, Alzheimer’s disease, stomach ulcers, and cancer. Laboratory studies indicate that curcumin can kill cancer cells, slow their growth, and prevent their development. However, human studies are still in the early stages and further studies are needed. One study noted that 3.6 grams of curcumin per day produced no adverse effects in patients. Additionally, the curcumin content of turmeric varies from 2-8%, and you would need to take in about 4 teaspoons of turmeric to potentially provide protection against cancer (1). Another source reported that you need 6-9 grams of turmeric to get 1 gram of curmcuminoids (which is the amount reported to reduce colon polyps by 66%) (2). Although an optimal dose has yet to be found, it may be a good idea to include turmeric in your diet.

Here are some tips for adding turmeric into your meals:

  • Sprinkle turmeric over cauliflower, eggs, salad, or use it as a seasoning for meat
  • Use it in an egg or potato salad
  • Find some great Indian recipes or go out for Indian food as many contain curry and turmeric
  • Try some Thai curry recipes or go out for Thai food
  • Use it as a substitute for saffron
  • Add it to soups
  • Try it in a new recipe:

Do you have any tasty recipes that use turmeric? If so, please share them! Also, if you would like more information on the possible benefits of curcumin, check out these sites:

Linus Pauling Institute

American Cancer Society

References:

  1. Collins, Karen. AICR Health Talk. January 17, 2011. http://aicr.convio.net/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=20054&news_iv_ctrl=0&abbr=pr_hf_
  2. Gill, Colleen. Making Sense of Herbs and Cancer. October 5, 2011. Teleconference.

March of Dimes

 

Contact:  Nicole Donegan
Communications and Marketing
(509) 654-4320

NicoleDonegan@yvmh.org

 

March of Dimes grant increases outreach to expectant moms

 

Six months after the March of Dimes awarded Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital a Chapter Community grant of $20,000, the funds are paying off.  Over 500 expectant parents have attended Memorial’s Childbirth Education classes.  In addition, Memorial has offered 35 prenatal Yoga classes aimed at improving maternal health and fitness during pregnancy.  Memorial has also begun offering a program to help improve communication between parents and their pregnant teens.  The classes are offered quarterly and include testimony from parents and teens, as well as advice from a certified mental health professional.  The grant has also allowed Memorial to implement Comenzando Bien, a Spanish language childbirth education curriculum, which is more sensitive to the cultural needs of Latino moms.

“While Memorial has always offered a wide range of prenatal education and programs, the grant from March of Dimes has helped us increase our programs to reach even more high risk mothers,” says Bertha Lopez, Community Outreach Manager for Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital.

The Washington State Department of Health Woman, Infant and Children annual report for 2010, shows that 72% of Yakima County families receiving their services are living in poverty (monthly income for a family of four living in poverty was $1,838 or less).  Yakima County also ranks among the highest in the State for teen birth rates, which are associated with poor prenatal care leading to pre-term delivery, low birth weight, and an increased risk of childhood developmental delay, illness and mortality.

In addition to offering more classes and programs, the March of Dimes grant has also offered Memorial an opportunity to increase prenatal health education through a variety of media outlets—particularly in Spanish-language television and radio programming—bringing the message for prenatal health to over 7,000 homes.

Memorial has also made great strides in reducing elective deliveries before the 39th week of gestation.  The March of Dimes granted Memorial an additional $5,000 towards reducing elective deliveries (cesarean or vaginal) births before the 39th week without medical cause, because it has been linked to increased complications with the baby’s health.   Washington State has set a goal for hospitals to perform fewer than 7% of cesarean sections before the 39th week.  Memorial’s rate for these deliveries was 2.7% for the 1st quarter of 2011 and 1.4% for the 2nd quarter of 2011.  The success is attributed to more thorough screenings of patients for a medical need to deliver before the 39th week as well  as stricter oversight of the deliveries scheduled at Memorial.

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The March of Dimes is a non-profit organization that helps mothers have full-term, healthy pregnancies and researches the problems that threaten the health of babies.

Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital has been providing healthcare to the Yakima Valley for over 60 years and continues to provide state-of-the-art, quality-of-life health care services for our community.  Memorial welcomes over 3,500 new births within the Yakima Valley each year.

The Memorial Foundation Honored

From the Yakima Herald Republic

10/15/11 Letters to the Editor

Great fundraising work

To the editor — Many people of Yakima know there is the Memorial Foundation, a part of the nonprofit Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital family. Many fewer are aware of the incredible small staff of the Foundation.

Headed by Anne Caffery, this staff has led the fundraising of over $11 million in the past three years for the Children’s Village expansion and the hospice house Cottage in the Meadow. In addition, it has raised $1 million each year for the many programs it supports — money all being spent in the community.

On Oct. 4 The Foundation was honored to speak at the annual Blackbaud conference in Washington, D.C.. Anne and three of her teammates presented their program “10 rules to break in a fundraising campaigns.” Blackbaud is the leader in consulting and advising nonprofits in the nation, therefore this recognition is significant.

The Foundation, while small, has coordinated the Children’s Miracle Network efforts in the county, coordinates and funds various school health programs, Children’s Village programs, many of these operating under the radar.

I want to publicly congratulate Anne and her great team for such phenomenal work.

WILLIAM A. WHEELER

Chairman Board of Trustees, Memorial Foundation

Yakima

USDA Launches MyPlate In Spanish

USDA Launches MyPlate In Spanish

The USDA has unveiled a Spanish version of the MyPlate healthy eating icon

 A new TV feature is available on the USDA FTP site 

Filename: MiPlato TV Feature

    Download instructions:

 The host: ftp://ocbmtcmedia.download.akamai.com

  User name: usdanews

Password:  Newscontent1

The new file is in QuickTime Movie (H.264 ), MPEG 4, MPEG2 and HDV.

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r3f87TtcV7U&feature=channel_video_title

   video podcast: http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/usda-down-to-earth-video-podcast/id461819504?uo=4

  RSS feed: http://downtoearth.usda.libsynpro.com/rss

Please email bob.ellison@usda.gov if you have problems or suggestions.

Also, use this free ftp client if you have problems.

http://filezilla-project.org/download.php?type+client

FEATURE – USDA Launches MyPlate Icon In Spanish

 

 

INTRO: The U-S-D-A has unveiled a Spanish version of the MyPlate healthy eating icon. The U-S-D-A’s Bob Ellison has more. (1:34)

 

THE U-S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAS LAUNCHED MI PLATO (ME-PLAH-TOE) TO HELP SPANISH-SPEAKING CONSUMERS MAKE HEALTHIER FOOD CHOICES. AGRICULTURE SECRETARY TOM VILSACK SAID AT A WHITE HOUSE EVENT THAT THE SPANISH VERSION OF THE MY PLATE ICON PROVIDES A SIMPLE AND EASY MESSAGE.

 

Tom Vilsack, Agriculture Secretary: We are launching the MiPlato effort in an opportunity to take all of the information that we have on healthy eating and the visual icon of what a healthy plate looks like with half the plate fruits and vegetables, whole grains, proteins and dairy and making sure that it’s available to Spanish-speaking individuals.

 

U-S SURGEON GENERAL DOCTOR REGINA BENJAMIN SAID AMERICANS NEED POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT ON HEALTHY EATING.

 

Dr. Regina Benjamin, U.S. Surgeon General: Mi Plato is a new and simple easy tool that will help them do just that. We want being healthy to be easy and to be fun and that’s MiPlato.

 

Vilsack: This icon makes it simple, you look at your plate and if half of it is not fruits and vegetables and the other half proteins and grains then you know you’ve got some work to do in your next meal to make sure there is proper balance.

 

VILSACK ALSO SAID THAT MI PLATO IS PART OF A LARGER U-S-D-A EFFORT TO ENCOURAGE HEALTHY EATING.

 

Vilsack: We are working very hard with schools across the country to make sure that they provide healthy breakfast and healthy lunch. So to the extent that we have less fat, less sodium, less sugar and more fruits and vegetables, whole grains and low-fat dairy in those school lunches, we’re having a tremendous impact.

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO CHOOSE MY PLATE DOT GOV. IN WASHINGTON D-C FOR THE U-S DEPARMENT OF AGRICULTURE, I’M BOB ELLISON.

 

Yakima Univision Health Shows

El Doctor Mario Chenal de North Star Lodge explica Cuidado de Salud para Hombres
Miércoles, Junio 15, 2011

Lily Gonzalez nos explica del riesgo de diabetes. La Clínica Central Washington Family Medicine en Yakima tiene clases informativas sobre el control de diabetes cada cuarto miércoles.
Martes, Julio 26, 2011

Lily Gonzalez nos invita a la Fiesta de Salud, sábado 30 de julio. Hay más informción en nuestra sección de eventos.
Viernes, Julio 22, 2011

El Doctor Mario Chenal de North Star Lodge explica la importancia de exámenes ginecológicos.
Miércoles, Septiembre 14, 2011

La Dra. De Marco García nos explica sobre la cirugia vascular. Para más información se puede llamar a la Yakima Vascular Clinic (509) 453-4614
Martes, Septiembre 27, 2011

Taller para Adolecentes Embarazados
Martes, Septiembre 27, 2011