Donna’s Race

Two years; 2 surgeries for ovarian cancer; rounds of chemo after both surgeries; and finally radiation which concluded in mid-July of this year.  At that point I couldn’t walk a block without being exhausted.  I set a goal for myself to walk the Seattle half marathon on November 25th.  With the help of a life-long friend, the blocks turned into miles, and slowly I built my stamina. I got to 8 miles a couple of weeks ago, and started hoping adrenalin would carry me to the finish line.  I had my son and his fiancée with me all 13.1 miles encouraging me and celebrating as the medals were placed around our necks. My shirt had the names of those who fight this disease, those who fought valiantly, my friends and family, and my medical team. They were all a part of this accomplishment!  Time to set a new goal!

 

Yakima Memorial Best Christmas Tree Contest!

For some strange reason, Shop Girl loves the color PINK at Christmas!

Which made me think about the BEST CHRISTMAS TREE CONTEST!
Bring  a photo to memorial’s Gift Shop or send me an attachment of your tree pamelaedwards@yvmh.org and the staff will vote on the most unique or gorgeous.

The winner with the most votes will win a $25.00 gift certificate to the shop!
AND don’t forget to stop by the shop today and take advantage of our BIG SALE! Complimentary sweet treats! (Deadline for photo of tree is Dec.15th)

Navigating the Holiday Season: Your Guide to Staying Fit and Healthy Between Thanksgiving and the New Year

By Lindsey Woodkey
Bring on the decorations, Christmas music, and wonderful holiday foods. The holiday season does not have to spell disaster for your waistline. Read on for tips on healthfully navigating this nutritionally tough time of the year.
Don’t Skip Meals – So many of us assume that because we will be indulging in holiday fare we should skip breakfast and lunch in order to save calories. All this will do is slow your metabolism to a crawl and leave you ravenous. Instead, eat a light protein snack before you head out, then you will be less hungry and more likely to stick to a healthy game plan.
Forget STRICT Dieting – Occasionally allow yourself to go off your diet a little. Trying to stay strict will only set you up for failure, instead, allow yourself to indulge within reason. Don’t however let one “treat” day become a week or three.
Watch out for Appetizers – Don’t sit down in front of the table for starters. Instead, grab a small plate and fill it with healthy items (veggies, fruits, dry roasted nuts, low fat meats), and just a few higher calorie favorites. Limit yourself to one trip to the appetizer table.
“Islands” not “Mountains” – How many of us dish up our plates and then look down at a pile of food not knowing where to start. Instead, take small portions of items you enjoy. You should be able to see your plate when you dig in.
Start with Veggies – Fill up on veggies or salad before eating higher calorie items. Next in line should be lean proteins, then the heavier carbohydrate items.
Drink Up, Water That Is!- Your body actually has to burn calories raising the temperature of cold water, so opt for ice water instead of sugary sodas or juices. Plus, water can help curb hunger. Remember your body doesn’t register the calories in beverages as it does foods.
Put your Fork Down Between Bites – Take time to chew your food and savor every bite. This way not only does food last longer, but your brain can tell your body when you’ve had enough.
Converse More – People who engage in conversation at the table tend to eat less than those who are focused on stuffing their mouths. Catch up with friends and relatives, spark conversation, and enjoy time with the people you love and care for most.
Drink Alcohol with Your Meal, Not Before – Having a glass of wine or a cold beer is fine, but doing so before you sit down to eat can lower your inhibitions and lead to poor food choices or overeating. Wait until you sit down to eat to pour yourself that glass of wine.
Use the Rating System – Before loading up a serving, ask yourself where it falls on a scale of 1 to 10, 1 being “I wouldn’t eat it if I was stranded on a desert island” and 10 being “I could eat this every day all day”. Lower than a 6? Save those calories for dishes that rate between 7 and 10. If you taste something and it isn’t what you hoped for, don’t feel obligated to finish it. There is no award for being a member of the “clean plate club”.
Make Your “Cheats” Wholesome – This often means choosing a homemade dish over one that’s prepackaged or processed. Skip the store bought cookies and go for the Grandma’s homemade pumpkin pie; forgo the store bought rolls and have mashed potatoes instead. Even if you are a little over your calorie budget, you will be getting more nutrients and fewer chemical additives.
Tablespoons, Not Ladles – This is like built in portion control! You will naturally serve yourself less when you use smaller utensils.
NEED IT vs. WANT IT – When it comes to going back for seconds, ask yourself if you really need more (as in you are truly still hungry) or if your brain is just telling your body it wants more. If the second is true, try drinking more water or clearing your dish so you can’t add more to your plate.
Don’t Be Afraid to Say No – Mom pushing her Jell-O dessert salad? Don’t think that you have to accept food that is offered. Politely decline saying you’re trying to stick with healthy diet changes, or you’re saving room for one of their other great dishes.
Sweat That Morning – Seek to lift weights using higher repetitions and compound movements (exercises that require multiple muscle groups). Also, perform at 20 – 40 minutes moderate to intense cardio the day of a large meal. This way, the foods consumed will be used for good instead of being stored as fat. Remember however, you can’t out-train a bad diet!
Multiple Parties? Be a Grazer – Pick the party in which you will enjoy appetizers, which will be your meal, and which you’ll only consume dessert. After all, it’s your company they desire.
Decide What Treats You’ll Enjoy and When – They seem to be everywhere this time of the year! Cookies at work, candy at the salon, brownies your neighbor brings over. Choose before the week begins how many “treats” you’ll allow yourself and stick to that number (the number will depend on your goals, activity level, etc.) Say you choose three. Once you’ve hit your quota, hold strong and say no to other temptations that arise.
Here’s to a safe, healthy, and happy holiday season. Make your goal to maintain your weight and fitness level while also enjoying this special time.
Lindsey Woodkey of Ellensburg is a certified personal trainer and group fitness instructor with bachelors’ degrees in exercise science and nutrition from Central Washington University.

20% off all Holiday Merchandise

Our Elves have adorable aprons and will be ready to serve you!

Shop Girl would like to invite everyone to the annual Holiday Open House!

at the Gift Shop at Memorial- Fri. Nov. 30th 9am to 8pm

20% off all Holiday Merchandise

Delicious cookies and fudge

Drawings for fabulous gifts

Free Gift with purchase (while supplies last)!!!

Cancer Tips: If you can’t sleep and you’re overwhelmed by anxiety, get help.

Friday:  If you can’t sleep and you’re overwhelmed by anxiety, get help.  Short-term use of a sleeping aid or anti anxiety medication prescribed by your doctor won’t result in addiction.  One important caveat:  Use medication to alleviate symptoms, such as sleeplessness, not to take feelings away.

He who dares to ascend the stairs of North Star Lodge is sure to experience the shock of their lives! Yes, real books line the shelves awaiting hungry consumers. And yet, so few explore what lies below the lobby level. Soooo, in our effort to entice you beyond the comfort zone of the dreaded…waiting area…(dunt, dunt, dun, dun) we will share small snippets from select books each week.

This week we feature the book entitled, “Surviving Cancer Emotionally” written by Roger Granet, M.D. A consulting psychiatrist at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Weill Medical College of Cornell University, a lecturer in psychiatry at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Cancer changes our lives – physically and emotionally. The more you understand about your psychological reactions to cancer, the more effectively you can cope. Dr. Granet offers a working list of guidelines for coping with a cancer diagnosis. These approaches and reminders can make it much easier to get through the initial stages of cancer.

Each day, we will share one of the tips offered in the book. If you wish to share some helpful tips please join us on our facebook page. You can check out Dr. Granet’s book at any time at North Star Lodge Stepping Stones Library. If you feel the need to discuss your concerns or emotions with someone, we are pleased to offer the skills of Charlotte Montgomery, Psycho-social Nurse at North Star Lodge for a consultation at (509) 574-3497.

Monday: Get administrative and secretarial help from your friends. The emotions surrounding diagnosis can be so powerful that you are likely to miss important information. Take a friend, spouse, partner or other family member along to serve as an extra pair of ears and take notes. If you receive a diagnosis or other information over the phone, have your helper listen in.

 

Cancer Tips: Balance solitude with connection.

Thursday:  Balance solitude with connection.  The sadness that follows a cancer diagnosis often drives people into being alone.  Some time by yourself is fine, but don’t over it.  Being with people your close to can help mitigate unhappy feelings and remind you of your place in the world.

He who dares to ascend the stairs of North Star Lodge is sure to experience the shock of their lives! Yes, real books line the shelves awaiting hungry consumers. And yet, so few explore what lies below the lobby level. Soooo, in our effort to entice you beyond the comfort zone of the dreaded…waiting area…(dunt, dunt, dun, dun) we will share small snippets from select books each week.

This week we feature the book entitled, “Surviving Cancer Emotionally” written by Roger Granet, M.D. A consulting psychiatrist at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Weill Medical College of Cornell University, a lecturer in psychiatry at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Cancer changes our lives – physically and emotionally. The more you understand about your psychological reactions to cancer, the more effectively you can cope. Dr. Granet offers a working list of guidelines for coping with a cancer diagnosis. These approaches and reminders can make it much easier to get through the initial stages of cancer.

Each day, we will share one of the tips offered in the book. If you wish to share some helpful tips please join us on our facebook page. You can check out Dr. Granet’s book at any time at North Star Lodge Stepping Stones Library. If you feel the need to discuss your concerns or emotions with someone, we are pleased to offer the skills of Charlotte Montgomery, Psycho-social Nurse at North Star Lodge for a consultation at (509) 574-3497.

Monday: Get administrative and secretarial help from your friends. The emotions surrounding diagnosis can be so powerful that you are likely to miss important information. Take a friend, spouse, partner or other family member along to serve as an extra pair of ears and take notes. If you receive a diagnosis or other information over the phone, have your helper listen in.