How a heart attack changed David’s life…

David Jones is an area manager for Goodwill, and sometimes his job requires that he drive to Tacoma for meetings. One Sunday, about four years ago, he did just that, heading out a day early so he could be ready to go the next morning.

On the drive west, however, David didn’t feel well. “I thought it was indigestion, heartburn. And I was a little nauseous,” he says.

But David, 59, had a job to do. He attended the meeting and drove himself home afterward. By this time, though, David was quite ill. “When I got home I was vomiting. I was white as a sheet, and I was in a cold sweat.”

David knew something was horribly wrong. His daughter called 911, but she couldn’t get through. All the circuits from her cell network provider were busy. David and his daughter began to panic.  “We could have used my phone, but we weren’t thinking,” he says. “I drove myself in. I wouldn’t even let my daughter do it. But, I have to say, if you want service in the Emergency Department, go in there clutching your chest,” he says, finding a sliver of humor in the most frightening day of his life.

The result? Three days in the hospital. Two stents (installed by Dr. Thomas McLaughlin of the Yakima Heart Center). 99 percent blockage in the main artery. David had a heart attack.

“It really changes your life,” he says quietly over a cup of coffee. “Before this I used to think, how do I get more money in my 401K? How do I get a bigger boat? And afterward I thought, when was the last time I told my wife I love her?

“It changed my whole perspective.”

David’s two daughters and a Virginia Mason Memorial nurse, who was now off-duty, stayed with David until his wife, Lori, could get to the hospital.

“The key takeaway for me was life-changing,” he says.

David, a longtime heavy smoker, immediately quit cigarettes. It was also discovered that he was prediabetic. But, he said to himself, “that’s one pill I’m not going to take.” David and Lori, in support, started attending Virginia Mason Memorial’s year-long Diabetes Prevention Program. They learned how to calculate the fat grams, and to incorporate more fruit, vegetables and yogurt into their diet.

They got hooked on the program, and then became competitive in their quest for good health.

“We didn’t start exercising right away, but then we started going to the YMCA three or four times a week, working out on the treadmill, track and with weights. I lost 35 pounds, and my wife lost over 40!

“We swear by the Diabetes Prevention Program.

“What happened to me was a gift, because I had the classic widow-maker. If you’re anybody — man, woman — and you have symptoms, go to the Emergency Department.

“I had no pain in my arm, but it felt like a cramp in my chest. The doctor asked me when the pain started, and I told him, “About two weeks into Mariners season.” Then I was out, in full cardiac arrest. We joked that those would have been my final words.

“But that was four years ago.”

1 in 30 baby boomers has HEP C. Are you at risk?

Hep C Facts:

  • Chronic (lasting a long time) hepatitis C (Hep C) is a virus that affects the liver. It is the most common blood-borne infection and affects about 3.5 million people in the US
  • Most people do not have symptoms of Hep C for years or even decades, which is why it is commonly called a silent disease
  • If left untreated, Hep C can cause liver damage and even lead to liver cancer

 

DO ANY OF THESE RISK FACTORS APPLY TO YOU?

  • Baby Boomer (born 1945 – 1965)
  • Received blood transfusion, an organ transplant, or kidney dialysis before 1992
  • Tattoos or body piercings iwht unsterilized tools
  • Sharing needles or straws for recreational use (even just one time)
  • Accidental needle sticks (most common with healthcare professionals)
  • Vietnam-era veteran
  • Being born to a mother with Hep C

GET TESTED

  • The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) recommends all Baby Boomers (born 1945 – 1965) get tested for Hep C
  • Ask your healthcare provider to test you for Hep C – this simple blood test is not part of routine blood work

HEP C CAN BE CURED

Cure means the Hep C virus is not detected in the blood when measured 3 months after treatment is completed.

Have questions about Hep C? Contact The Liver Clinic at Memorial Cornerstone Medicine at 509-573 3819.

Source: HEPCHOPE.com

Cooking for one

We are learning to cook good and delicious meals that are healthy and easily made for one.
In the class you will be participating with others who share similar desires of learning to cook
for one. Everyone participates with hands on cooking and demonstration of meal preparation.
Participants will receive a copy of A Meal for Me: Simple Strategies for cooking for one.

The course is taught by our Executive Chef with Virginia Mason Memorial.
2018 Classes: Thursday / January 18 / 4:00 p.m.
Friday / February 2 / 4:00 p.m.
Friday / March 16 / 4:00 p.m.
Friday / April 13 / 4:00 p.m.

Location: Cottage in the Meadow / 1208 S 48th Ave

Space is Limited.
Please register with Nick Valadez — 509-574-6746 or email: nicholasvaladez@yvmh.org

Is your child grieving the death of a parent, sibling, or loved one?

Is your child grieving the death of a parent, sibling, or loved one?

Kids Grief Workshops
Saturday / February 24 & April 28 / 2018
11:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.
Cottage in the Meadow / 1208 S 48th Ave—Conference Room

Lunch will be provided for every family. Parents can enjoy lunch with the children before the activities begin.

For more information or to register for the workshop, contact Nicholas Valadez at nicholasvaladez@yvmh.org or 509-574-6746.

Virginia Mason Memorial is offering hands-on workshops to help guide children ages 5–17 and their parents or guardians through the grief associated with death.

Each workshop will provide an opportunity for children to express their feelings and thoughts through creative activities and meet others who have experienced a similar loss.

While children are participating in activities to assist their recovery, parents and guardians will be involved in their own grief recovery program geared for adults.

 

Child and Babysitter Safety Classes

Do you have an 11-15 year old at home that is looking to start babysitting? Are you 11-15 and want to start babysitting but aren’t sure about how to begin or if you’re ready for the responsibility? Why not learn the basics and safety all while earning a CPR and first aid certification! Come join us at Lakeview Pavilion for our new Child and Babysitter Safety (CABS) Classes. Our ASHI certified instructors will educate you in the basics of CPR and first aid, in responsible supervision, in handling emergency situations, and in building your babysitting business. Classes are just $40 and registration is just one click away. Grab a parent and go to https://yakimamemorial.org/medical-services-com-nutrition-and-fitness.asp#safe to sign up today!