Category Archives: Cancer Care

The Memorial Foundation – Keeping Support Local

The Memorial Foundation – Keeping Support Local

We are happy to reaffirm the Attorney General’s Charitable Solicitations Program most recent report which states that The Memorial Foundation devotes 89% of donations directly to health programs. Another confirmation and reassurance that our community’s charitable dollars stay local and support community healthcare programs, patients and families.

Keeping support local means dollars are at work right here in our community…directly serving children, families, your neighbors, your loved ones…you.

Through The Memorial Foundation, our community has made hope, care, compassion and wellness possible for many thousands in our community who needed just the right health care service at just the right time. Made possible only through generous giving, for over twenty-five years The Memorial Foundation has been dedicated to improving health outcomes for a healthy community.

Memorial Offers Community Training on Advance Directives

fivewishes 2015The Washington State Medical Association and Washington State Hospital Association have identified advance directives as a key initiative in medical care and substantial time and energy is being placed on this endeavor around our state.

At Memorial, we offer general training on advance directives, and Five Wishes in particular, in one-hour sessions (45 minutes for training, plus 15 minutes Q&A).

During these sessions, you will learn about Washington state’s focus pertaining to an advance directive, what an advance directive consists of (and what makes it legal in Washington), and how to carry out—as well as complete—an advance directive using Five Wishes. You will also receive information regarding the Physicians Orders for Life Sustaining Treatment (POLST) form.

You have several opportunities to attend Five Wishes Advance Directive training:

Tuesday, May 26, YVMH Auditorium, 5 pm

Tuesday, June 2, North Star Lodge, 2 pm

Wednesday, June 10, YVMH Auditorium, Noon

Wednesday, July 9, YVMH Auditorium, Noon

Tuesday, August 11, YVMH Auditorium, Noon

Open to the community. No registration required.

Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital Auditorium (in the basement)
2800 Tieton Drive, Yakima, WA 98902 Map this address

North Star Lodge
808 N. 39th Ave., Yakima, WA 98902 Map this address

Memorial plants onsite garden to supply Cafe with fresh veggies

Fresh-Vegetables-5FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Contact: Shannon Dininny, Memorial Communications, (509) 577-5051

Entrees and salads will feature fresh ingredients from the garden

YAKIMA – Employees and volunteers at Memorial Family of Services have planted an onsite herb and vegetable garden as part of Memorial’s efforts to be more sustainable and encourage our community to consume more fresh fruits and vegetables.

Workers tilled and composted the garden in April and began planting vegetables on Tuesday, May 19. Crops planted include tomatoes, peppers, zucchini, cucumbers, green beans, radishes, pumpkins and herbs in a 3,200-square-foot plot off of South 29th Avenue behind Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital. These fresh ingredients are all for Memorial use in patient meals and at The Memorial Cafe.

“My hope is that the herbs and vegetables we grow will help to sustain The Cafe through summer and into early fall,” says Cindy Parkey, Memorial Director of Food Services. “Our aim is to provide healthy options for our patients, visitors and employees, while at the same time, focusing on local ingredients and sustainability. This garden is one step toward that goal.”

Parkey wishes to extend special thanks to Yakima Master Gardeners for planting guidance and to Cowiche Creek Nursery and Blueberries, where Memorial bought the plants.

The garden planting matches Memorial’s renewed focus on sustainability under the Healthier Hospitals Initiative, a national campaign to focus on sustainability in health care and improve the health of communities, reduce environmental impact and decrease overall health care costs through better public health.

Memorial joined the Healthier Hospitals Initiative in January. Under the healthier foods and beverages part of the challenge, Memorial has committed to decreasing the amount of meat purchased by 20 percent within a three-year period, increasing healthy beverage purchases and increasing the percentage of local (within 250 miles) food purchased by 20 percent annually.

About Memorial Family of Services

Memorial Family of Services is the largest employer in Central Washington’s Yakima County, with some 2,500 employees who share the organization’s core purpose: to inspire people to thrive. Memorial Family of Services includes Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital – a 226-bed, acute-care, nonprofit community hospital – as well as primary care practices and specialty care services, including high-quality cardiac care, a continuum of cancer care, nationally-recognized home health and hospice care, and advanced services for children with special health care needs. Visit Memorial online at yakimamemorial.org or on Facebook (www.facebook.com/yakimavalleymemorialhospital), Twitter (www.twitter.com/Yakima_Memorial) or Pinterest (www.pinterest.com/yvmh).

Many adults missing cancer screenings

Cancer screenings 2015May 19, 2015—Americans aren’t as up-to-date with cancer screenings as they should be, reported the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Regular screenings for breast, cervical and colorectal cancers can catch cancers early, when treatment is likely to work best. This lack of screening means that individuals aren’t getting tests that can save lives. The trends also point to problems in reaching the government’s Healthy People 2020 goals for cancer screening.

The report

Researchers looked at data from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey, which is used to monitor progress toward health screening goals.

The analysis showed that, in comparison to previous years, screening levels for breast, cervical and colorectal cancers either fell behind or showed no improvement. Here’s a look at the numbers:

Breast cancer:

  • The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that women ages 50 to 74 have a mammogram every 2 years.
  • Healthy People 2020 screening goal: 81.1 percent.
  • Current screening levels: 72.6 percent.
  • Areas of concern: Mammogram rates were lower for women age 50 to 64 than age 65 to 74. They were also lower for Hispanic women, women without insurance and women without a usual source of healthcare.

Cervical cancer:

  • The USPSTF recommends that women ages 21 to 65 receive a Pap test at least every 3 years, unless they’ve had a hysterectomy.
  • Healthy People 2020 screening goal: 93 percent.
  • Current screening levels: 80.7.
  • Areas of concern: Pap test use was lower for Asian women, Hispanic women, women ages 51 to 65 and foreign-born women. Women who were uninsured or publicly insured were less likely to get the test than women with private insurance.

Colorectal cancer:

  • The USPSTF recommends that people ages 50 to 75 choose 1 of the following options:
    • Fecal occult blood test (FOBT) every year.
    • Sigmoidoscopy every 5 years and FOBT every 3 years.
    • Colonoscopy every 10 years.
  • Healthy People 2020 screening goal: 70.5 percent.
  • Current screening levels: 58.2 percent.
  • Areas of concern: Test use was lower among Asian and Hispanic people, except Puerto Ricans. Testing was also lower among people aged 50 to 64 compared to those 65 to 75. Test use was slightly lower among men. People without a usual source of care or insurance had a particularly low test rate.

Overall, the data showed no progress toward the screening goals for 2020. In order to reach these targets, researchers encouraged higher efforts to reduce barriers—such as finances and lack of insurance—that keep people from screening. They also suggested that making the public more aware of screening options could help improve these trends.

Find more details on these trends in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

The take-home message
Cancer screening could save your life. Regular testing may help detect breast, cervical and colorectal cancers early. Treatment at these early stages tends to be most successful.

Make regular screening a priority. Learn about screening options and recommendations for:

Talk to your doctor about what screenings are right for you.

 

Cauliflower- What’s not to love?

Cauli 2015Cauliflower- What’s not to love?

Kim McCorquodale RD, CSO
North Star Lodge

I find it interesting when different vegetables become the latest and greatest thing, the “food of the week” so to speak. You would have to live under a rock lately to not see all the many ways to eat cauliflower. No longer the spurned veggie because it’s only white and not “colorful.” Cauliflower has arrived on the vegetable social scene with a vengeance!

When I checked the brochure The Cancer Fighters in your Food (available from the American Institute for Cancer Research), I read that cauliflower provides the phytochemicals sulforaphane and lutein, like many other cruciferous veggies do. Sulforaphane belongs in the Isothiocyanate phytochemical family, and the possible actions and benefits of these include:

  • Antioxidant activity
  • Blocking tumor growth
  • Apotosis- causing cancer cells to die and
  • Inhibiting inflammation

All good things for sure! Check out their web site to order reliable information and access tons of fabulous, healthy recipes.

Back to our favorite white cruciferous veggie – I have always enjoyed lightly steaming cauliflower and eating it with just a touch of parmesan cheese sprinkled on top. Or raw in salads, especially subbing in for broccoli on occasion. But, to get your juices flowing, check out just a few of the recipes creative people have come up with.

Cauliflower pizza crust– apparently this is very good, although I have to admit I haven’t tried it yet.

Low-carb cauliflower recipes, such as tortillas, poppers, cheesy tots, and even chocolate brownies!

Parmesan Roasted Cauliflower– a fancy version of what I’ve done for a long time.

So, have fun and try some of these- and please let us know what you think J

Celebration of Life Event

Celebration of Life Event

May 13, 2015

Dealing with the death of a loved one is difficult, and no one should grieve alone.

Memorial Family of Services invites you to a celebration of life service to remember your loved one and all those we have loved and lost.

The service will be held Wednesday, May 13, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at Cottage in the Meadow, located at 1208 S. 48th Ave., Yakima. The service includes a small memorial ceremony, music and refreshments and is offered at no charge by The Memorial Foundation. Parking is limited, so carpooling is encouraged.

For more information about this event or about Memorial’s bereavement services, call Julie Cicero (SIS-er-oh) at 574-3670 or visit www.yakimamemorial.org.

Memorial seeks volunteers for hospice and palliative care programs

A geriatrician holds the hand of an elderly woman with arthritis.

It’s difficult living with a life-limiting illness. Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital’s hospice and palliative care programs provide services to people suffering a life-limiting illness and their families.

But these programs rely heavily on volunteers. Whether it’s a home hospice program or the Transitions palliative care program, volunteers provide vital services and information to families in need.

They may handle light meal preparation, housekeeping or medication delivery. They provide companionship – maybe helping to make a quilt, style someone’s hair or reading aloud.

Memorial is seeking people who may be interested in volunteering for its hospice and palliative care programs. Volunteers must meet certain requirements and complete several hours of specialized training.

For more information, call (509) 574-3655.

Generosity of Spirit Multiplied

Generosity of Spirit Multiplied
By Laurie Oswalt, M.Div.
Director of Spiritual Care at Memorial
I was in the basement of Memorial Hospital one morning, walking past an area where furniture waits to be repaired. I overheard one employee tell another about an extravagant wheelchair that had been donated by a family after their loved one had died, and the employee didn’t know what to do with it. In typical fashion, I interrupted the two employees, saying, “I know EXACTLY what to do with it!” I took it and put it in my office, then I contacted my friend, Ted Cowan from the Naches Lions Club and asked if he could use it. Could he ever!!
The Naches Lions Club has a program for receiving, and loaning out, medical equipment to patients in our area. The Lions Club has a barn in Naches where all of the equipment is stored—it’s an amazing space, where everything from canes to commodes to crutches, from wheelchairs to hospital beds, from lift chairs to bath chairs is housed. People are welcome to borrow equipment, at no cost. When the equipment is no longer needed, then the equipment is returned…often with more medical equipment that has accumulated in the family garage.
This program works for two reasons: it’s an inexpensive way to meet a need in our community, and equipment is borrowed and returned…and more is donated. If you have any medical equipment that you would like to offer to the Lions Club medical equipment program, please contact Ted Cowan of the Naches Lions Club: (509) 653-2486.
Now, what about that great wheelchair that was in my office? Well, apparently the people I explained the program to (the ones who gave me the wheelchair) thought it was such a great program that they decided to add to it; I left my office to go to a meeting, and by the time I got back, my extravagant wheelchair had multiplied to TWO wheelchairs!

Nutritionist vs Dietitian – Is there a difference?

By Kim McCorquodale RDN, CSO, CD
North Star Lodge

The world of nutrition can be a confusing one. There are new studies with new results all of the time. It can be hard to decide what the right thing to eat is or who to trust. And there are many people anxious to help you with those choices. How do you know what to do? I thought it might be helpful to start with what the letters that follow a person’s name.

I listed “my letters” above and will explain them all. The first, RDN, stands for “registered dietitian nutritionist.” Many “registered dietitians” (RDs) have started to add the N at the end because the word “dietitian” can be limiting or confusing. But, if it says either RD or RDN that means the person is a health professional who has university qualifications consisting of a 4-year Bachelor Degree in Nutrition and Dietetics or a 3-year Science Degree followed by a Master Degree in Nutrition and Dietetics, including a certain period of practical training in different hospital and community settings (in the U.S. 1200 hours of supervised practice are required in different areas). They must meet national standards for professional legislation which includes passing a comprehensive exam and obtaining continuing education requirements.

The CSO after my name means I am a “certified specialist in oncology.” This means I have practiced a minimum of 2000 hours in the field of oncology nutrition in the past 5 years and have passed a rigorous exam. This exam must be retaken every 5 years to ensure the CSO remains current in the ever-changing field of oncology nutrition.

The CD after my name stands for “certified dietitian.” This simply means that the state of Washington has reviewed my qualifications and found they meet current standards. This is a credential that must be annually renewed.

The term “nutritionist” is harder to pin down. A “nutritionist” is a non-accredited title that may apply to somebody who has a PhD in Nutrition or to someone who has given themselves the title and to something in between. The term “nutritionist” is not protected by law in almost all countries, so people with different levels of knowledge can call themselves a “nutritionist.” It does not necessarily mean the person is uneducated or a “quack” or they are supplying inaccurate information. It just means it is up to you to make certain the person you are consulting is a qualified health professional and has the expertise. This task is much more difficult when the person does not have an accredited title.

Of course, all the letters in the world are not a 100% guarantee of the perfect health professional for your needs. You still need to investigate them carefully and make sure you understand any advice given to you. But, I hope the above information helps you make an informed decision in the interesting world of nutrition.