Category Archives: Health Information

Memorial Hospital rebrands to reflect affiliation with Virginia Mason Health System

November 2, 2016

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Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital rebrands to reflect affiliation with Virginia Mason Health System

YAKIMA — After more than 60 years of serving the Yakima Valley community as Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital, the hospital and its primary and specialty care clinics have become Virginia Mason Memorial. This new name and brand reflect Memorial’s affiliation with innovative health-care leader Virginia Mason Health System
in Seattle.
Memorial and Virginia Mason affiliated on Jan. 1, 2016. Ever since, teams from both sides of the mountains have been working to combine and streamline care and services. In choosing the new name it was vital that Memorial continue to have a strong identity as the trusted health-care provider and also a prominent economic engine for the Yakima Valley community and in the Central Washington region.

The creation of a health-care system with a local presence in each community — where patients receive the same high-quality, coordinated care at Memorial in Yakima or Virginia Mason in Seattle — was a primary focus for the integration. Also, the affiliation is bringing more resources (physicians, nursing education, best practices in care, expansion of surgical and specialty care) eastward. Virginia Mason Memorial is also working to adopt the Virginia Mason Production system, the internationally recognized method of quality and service improvement that focuses on patients.

About Virginia Mason Memorial
Virginia Mason Memorial, part of the Virginia Mason Health System, is a 226-bed, acute-care, nonprofit, community hospital serving Central Washington’s Yakima Valley. Virginia Mason Memorial includes primary care practices and specialty care services including high-quality cardiac care; cancer care through North Star Lodge; breast health at `Ohana Mammography Center; acute hospice and respite care at Cottage in the Meadow, winner of the Circle of Life Award from the American Hospital Association for innovative palliative and end-of-life care; pain management at Water’s Edge; an advanced NICU unit, the only place in Central Washington that offers specialty care for at-risk infants; advanced services for children with special health care needs at Children’s Village; and The Memorial Foundation, a separate 501c(3) organization that raises funds for innovative health care programs in the Yakima Valley (www.memfound.org).
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Visit Memorial online at www.yakimamemorial.org or on Facebook (www.facebook.com/yakimavalleymemorialhospital), Twitter (www.twitter.com/Yakima_Memorial) or Pinterest (www.pinterest.com/yvmh).

Seattle-based Virginia Mason Health System is a nonprofit regional health care system that includes 336-bed Virginia Mason Hospital; Virginia Mason Memorial in Yakima; medical centers in Seattle, Bainbridge Island, Bellevue, Federal Way, Kirkland, Issaquah and Lynnwood; Bailey-Boushay House, the first skilled-nursing and outpatient chronic care management program in the U.S. designed for people with HIV/AIDS; Benaroya Research Institute, which is internationally recognized for autoimmune disease research; and the Virginia Mason Institute, which trains health care professionals and others from around the world in the Virginia Mason Production System, an innovative management methodology for continually improving quality, safety and efficiency. Virginia Mason online: www.VirginiaMason.org

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Alzheimer’s Association Hosts Central Washington Memory Loss Conference on Nov. 2

Alzheimer’s Association Hosts Central Washington Memory Loss Conference on Nov. 2

YAKIMA – Alzheimer’s is the third leading cause of death in Washington state. It is expected to be a major health issue in the years to come as baby boomers retire. But there is help and support available for those caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s or dementia.

A day-long educational conference Nov. 2 at the Yakima Convention Center will provide tools and encouragement to family caregivers and health-care professionals caring for those with dementia.

Family caregivers will have sessions tailored to their needs, offering helpful tips to address the challenges of caring for a loved one with dementia. Those include relationship changes, communication, keeping them safe and managing difficult behaviors.

The sessions, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., will be offered concurrently in both English and Spanish, and are free for family caregivers caring for loved ones. A special track for health-care professionals is $50. It offers basic and advanced sessions to address the progression of dementia-related diseases. A complimentary box lunch is provided.

There is also a separate, education program in the evening, which focuses on frontotemporal dementia, for continuing education credits for medical providers. This no-cost program will be held at Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences.

The conference is sponsored by The Memorial Foundation, The Peggy Schaake Charitable Fund, Highgate Senior Living, Southeast Washington Aging & Long Term Care.

For more information or to register, visit alzwa.org, email MemoryLossConf@alz.org or call 800-848-7097 ext. 8170.

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Dress up as your favorite superhero & run/walk to benefit local kids on Oct. 15

Dress up as your favorite superhero!
and run/walk to benefit local kids on Oct. 15

Ace Hardware is hosting a run/walk on Saturday, Oct. 15, to benefit Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals and participants are encouraged to dress up as their favorite superhero for the “Superheroes for Local Miracles!” 5K.

The event, sponsored by Ace and Les Schwab Tires, will be held at the Ace Hardware Distribution Center, 7702 Duffield Road, Moxee. Registration begins at 8 a.m., and the event begins at 9 a.m. The cost to enter, which includes a T-shirt, is $25 for adults and $15 for youth under age 16.

All donations stay local to fund critical treatments and health-care services, pediatric medical equipment and charitable care. Proceeds from this event benefit the Neo-Natal Intensive Care Unit and Pediatric Department at Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital, as well as programs and services at Children’s Village, which serves Central Washington children with special health care needs and their families.
Memorial is one of 170 nonprofit Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals that treat severely injured and ill children in the U.S. and Canada.

CWU Dance Marathon to benefit local Children’s Miracle Network hospital

CWU Dance Marathon to benefit local Children’s Miracle Network hospital

Contact: Rebecca Teagarden, Memorial Communications: (509) 577-5051

WHAT: Central Washington University is hosting a dance marathon to benefit Children’s Miracle Network. Students will dance for 5 hours straight for kids who can’t. All money raised locally stays local; going to Central Washington’s only CMN hospital, Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital.
Donations can be made here: http://events.dancemarathon.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=donorDrive.event&eventID=1085.

WHO: Students at CWU dancing to help area kids.

WHEN: 5 to 10 p.m., Friday, Oct. 7.

WHERE: Central’s Student Union and Recreation Center Ballroom, 400 E. University Way, Ellensburg.

VISUALS: Very tired but determined dancers!

INTERVIEWS: Josh Munson, Development and Communications Director, The Memorial Foundation: 509-576-5794. Dallas Murrey, CWU student and event organizer: 253-678-9854.

BACKGROUND: Proceeds from this event benefit the Neo-Natal Intensive Care Unit and Pediatric Department at Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital, as well as programs and services at Children’s Village, which serves Central Washington children with special health care needs and their families.

Memorial is one of 170 nonprofit Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals that treat severely injured and ill children in the U.S. and Canada.

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Pasco Walmart hosts family-fun carnival to benefit local Children’s Miracle Network hospital

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Pasco Walmart hosts family-fun carnival
to benefit local Children’s Miracle Network hospital

Families will find more than great deals at the Pasco Walmart Supercenter this Saturday when the store hosts a family-fun carnival to benefit Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals.

The carnival, which includes fun games and food, will be held Saturday, Sept. 24, from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Walmart Supercenter, 4820 N. Road 68, Pasco.

As part of Walmart’s CMN fund-raising campaign, through Oct. 9 customers can donate to their local Children’s Miracle Network Hospital when they stop in at Walmart and Sam’s Club stores. Since 1987, Walmart and Sam’s Club associates, team members, members and customers have raised nearly $1 billion dollars for Network children’s hospitals.

All donations stay local to fund critical treatments and health-care services, pediatric medical equipment and charitable care. Help kids live better and Put Your Money Where the Miracles Are at Walmart and Sam’s Club registers.

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Proceeds from this event benefit the Neo-Natal Intensive Care Unit and Pediatric Department at Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital, as well as programs and services at Children’s Village, which serves Central Washington children with special health care needs and their families.

Memorial is one of 170 nonprofit Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals that treat severely injured and ill children in the U.S. and Canada.

Local contact: Pasco Walmart store manager is Alisha Jones. She can be reached at ajones.s03380.us@wal-mart.com or 509-543-7934.

 

Memorial Foundation Receives $25,000 Walmart Foundation Grant

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  

Contact: Rebecca Teagarden, Memorial Communications, 509-577-5051

$25,000 grant from Walmart supports childhood obesity program
and classes that encourage healthy living in Yakima County

The Memorial Foundation has received a $25,000 grant from the Walmart Foundation to support the ACT! Get Up, Get Moving! childhood obesity program and the Kohl’s Healthy For Life program.  Both of these community education and wellness programs have seen significant growth in the past few years as Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital works to reduce Yakima County’s high rates of obesity and diabetes.

ACT! is an evidenced-based program offered through Memorial and the Yakima Valley YMCA that models nutrition recommendations and physical activities for families. The healthy lifestyle program is geared for overweight children and teens, ages 8-14, and their parents or guardians. Through the generous donation, Memorial plans to expand ACT! to reach 120 Hispanic children and their parents each year in the Lower Yakima Valley where no similar resources exist. ACT! will also continue to serve 136 children and parents annually in the Upper Yakima Valley.

The Kohl’s Healthy for Life program provides community-based cooking classes to encourage healthy eating and nutrition, and drop-in fitness and exercise classes. The goal is to serve more than 7,000 participants each year.

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Learn more about the upcoming Alzheimer’s Walk & Memory Loss Conference

Getting the word out about the Walk to End Alzheimer’s AND the Central Washington Memory Loss Conference.

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Claire Fallat, left, and Debbie Hunter, right, met KIMA-TV reporter Jackie DelPilar in Franklin Park today for a story about Yakima’s Alzheimer’s Walk on Saturday, Sept. 17, AND to talk about the Central Washington Memory Loss Conference on Nov. 2.

Claire is the Yakima Alzheimer’s Walk coordinator and Debbie is a devoted advocate for Alzheimer’s research and support. Her husband, Chris, got Alzheimer’s disease at age 48 and now is in hospice care. The disease changed their family’s life forever.

Find out more about the walk at alz.org/walk or 206-529-3878.

For more information on the day-long conference (FREE for family caregivers): alzwa.org or call 206-363-5000, ext. 8170.

Memorial offers class to learn infant CPR, Sept. 7

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Rebecca Teagarden, Memorial Communications, 509-577-5051

Memorial offers class to learn infant CPR
Sept. 7, 2016

Unintentional choking and suffocation are the leading causes of all injury deaths for infants under 1 year of age. Being prepared for such an emergency can make all the difference.

Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital is offering an opportunity for parents and caregivers of infants to learn when a baby needs rescue breathing, how to start CPR and how to care for an infant who’s choking. The class is Sept. 7 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Memorial’s Community Education Center, 2506 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima. No registration is needed. The cost is $5 per person.

This is not a CPR certification class. But knowing how to respond in the first few minutes of an emergency – before professional help arrives – can mean the difference between life and death. If you are the parent or caregiver of an infant, learn infant CPR!

For more information, call 509-248-7322 or visit the Classes and Events page at yakimamemorial.org.

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Common genes raise diabetes risk, study finds

July 26, 2016— Experts have long known that a person’s risk for getting type 2 diabetes is partly related to genes. But now, a large new study is shining a much brighter light on the disease’s genetic component.

Type 2 diabetes is a serious health problem that affects roughly 1 in 10 people worldwide. Learning more about why some people are more likely to get the disease than others can help scientists develop more effective treatments.

About the study

Researchers studied the DNA of more than 120,000 people of European, South and East Asian, North and South American, and African descent. They compared the genetic information from people without diabetes to those with type 2 diabetes.

They found that most of the genetic risk for diabetes comes from certain common gene changes, or variants. Each of these changes plays a small part in raising a person’s overall diabetes risk.

This knowledge can help scientists find new treatments that take a person’s individual genetic profile into account. However, researchers say more studies are still needed to learn about the gene variants in other groups of people.

Read more about the study in Nature.

The take-home message
Your family history might put you at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. But that doesn’t mean you’re guaranteed to get the disease, says the American Diabetes Association.

Even if you’re predisposed to diabetes, there are plenty of risk factors that you have the power to change. These include:

Being overweight.
Having high blood sugar.
Having high blood pressure.
Having high cholesterol.
Being inactive.
Smoking.
Eating an unhealthy diet.
Talk with your doctor about first steps toward a healthier lifestyle. You might decide to try to eat a healthier diet or exercise more. That can help you lose weight and improve your blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol. If you smoke, it’s important to come up with a plan for quitting. Your doctor can help with that too.

Want to learn more about diabetes prevention? Test your knowledge and find out about your risk factors with this short quiz.