Bertha Lopez to serve as director of Children’s Village

Bertha Lopez to serve as director of Children’s Village

After 28 years with Virginia Mason Memorial, most recently as the Director of Children’s Village, Jackie McPhee has officially retired. Her last day was March 3, 2017.  Children’s Village was honored to have Jackie’s longtime commitment, leadership and support.

To assure continuity of leadership responsibilities, the Children’s Village leadership team and trustee partners have asked Bertha Lopez to assume the directorship at Children’s Village. Bertha Lopez, currently senior director of Community Health Planning and Development at Virginia Mason Memorial, has a master’s degree from the University of Washington’s Foster School of Business. With over 10 years of experience in health advocacy and work mitigating health disparities, Bertha enables Children’s Village to continue its mission and meet the needs of children with special health care needs and their families in the Yakima Valley.

Children’s Village is instrumental in providing supportive services to over 4,000 children every year.

 ABOUT CHILDREN’S VILLAGE:

Children’s Village is a regional integrated center for children with special health care needs and their families, with multiple service providers all under one roof. The comprehensive family-centered organization aims to meet each child’s need for individualized care with over 30 different kinds of specialized services. There are medical specialty clinics, developmental evaluations and collaborative diagnostic clinics, dental services, occupational, physical and speech therapy, mental health counseling, education services, behavioral intervention and nurse home visiting programs. The Village also offers a comprehensive parent and family support program called Parent to Parent, which serves families from birth through life. Find out more at yakimachildrensvillage.org.

Day-long workshop on March 21 will train educators, counselors and others to help youth cope with grief

Day-long workshop on March 21 will train educators, counselors
and others to help youth cope with grief

 Children learn lots of things in school, on their computers, from television and their friends, but one topic usually is never discussed: death and the grief that goes with it. On Tuesday, March 21, Virginia Mason Memorial is sponsoring a day-long workshop open to anyone interested in learning how to best respond to the needs of children and end-of-life issues.

Topics to be covered include:

  • Understanding and supporting the needs of children and teens who are coping with the death of a loved one.
  • Tips for grieving students in the classroom and community.
  • What to do (and not do) when a student dies.
  • Special considerations following homicide or suicide.

The workshop will be led by Donna L. Schuurman, senior director of advocacy and training at The Dougy Center: The National Center for Grieving Children & Families located  in Portland, Ore. Schuurman writes and trains internationally on bereavement issues and wrote the book “Never the Same: Coming to Terms with the Death of a Parent.”

The Dougy Center, the first center in the United States to provide peer support groups for grieving children, was founded in 1982. Over the past 35 years, the center has served 40,000 children, teens and their families, and has received national and international acclaim for pioneering the peer support model for helping children cope with the death of a family member.

The no-cost workshop will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 21, in the auditorium at Lakeview, 1470 N. 16th Ave. Lunch will be provided.

To register please call 509-574-6746 or email nicholasvaladez@yvmh.org.

Pancakes at IHOP & Virginia Mason Memorial on Tuesday, March 7, benefit local children

Pancakes at IHOP & Virginia Mason Memorial on Tuesday, March 7, benefit local children

IHOP to raise funds for Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals® throughout February and on National Pancake Day

YAKIMA, WA. — Today, March 7, is National Pancake Day! And area IHOP restaurants and the café at Virginia Mason Memorial hospital are offering guests a free short stack of their famous buttermilk pancakes all day. This family-friendly tradition aims to raise needed funds and awareness for Virginia Mason Memorial, the local Children’s Miracle Network hospital.
For every short stack of buttermilk pancakes served on National Pancake Day between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. (and until 7:30 p.m. at Virginia Mason Memorial), IHOP guests are invited to make a donation to Children’s Miracle Network. Since 2006, IHOP’s National Pancake Day has raised approximately $15 million to provide life-saving treatment, programs and medical equipment for children — including the thousands of patients treated annually at Virginia Mason Memorial.
In the weeks before National Pancake Day, participating IHOP restaurants also sold Miracle Balloons for $1 and $5 to benefit Children’s Miracle Network. The balloons are available through National Pancake Day, and all proceeds benefit local children. Guests who purchase a $5 Miracle Balloon will receive a $5 discount coupon that can be used during their next visit to IHOP.
“We are so grateful for IHOP’s continued support for Children’s Miracle Network and Virginia Mason Memorial,” said Josh Munson, Memorial’s Children’s Miracle Network program director. “Their support is vital to sustaining the programs and equipment needed for our children with health care challenges.”

Stop in at the following IHOP location on Tuesday, March 7, to benefit Children’s Miracle Network:
• Ellensburg, 2704 Triple L Loop

For more information or to make a donation to Virginia Mason Memorial, visit www.IHOPpancakeday.com.
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ABOUT VIRGINIA MASON MEMORIAL
Proceeds from this event benefit the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Pediatric Department at Virginia Mason Memorial, as well as programs and services at Yakima’s Children’s Village, which serves Central Washington children with special health care needs and their families.

Virginia Mason Memorial is one of 170 nonprofit Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals that treat severely injured and ill children in the U.S. and Canada.

ABOUT CHILDREN’S MIRACLE NETWORK HOSPITALS
Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals raises funds and awareness for 170 member hospitals that provide 32 million treatments each year to kids across the U.S. and Canada. Donations — including all those made on IHOP National Pancake Day — stay local to fund critical treatments and health care services, pediatric medical equipment and charitable care. Since 1983, Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals has raised more than $5 billion, most of it $1 at a time through the charity’s Miracle Balloon icon. Its fundraising partners and programs support the nonprofit’s mission to save and improve the lives of as many children as possible. Find out why children’s hospitals need community support and learn about your member hospital at CMNHospitals.org.

Generations OB/GYN joins Virginia Mason Memorial

Generations OB/GYN joins Virginia Mason Memorial

YAKIMA — Generations OB/GYN is now part of the Virginia Mason Memorial family. The addition of the Yakima specialty-care practice aims to improve access to care for our community and assures the long-term stability of this physician practice.
“The whole focus for all of us in the coming years is about access to care,” said Virginia Mason Memorial CEO Russ Myers. “And to assure access, we need to partner with our physicians in ways that allow for the long-term stability of practices. Often it is very difficult to recruit physicians for specialty practices. We want to make sure we provide the best opportunity to recruit and retain physicians. Bringing Generations on as part of the family is a step in that direction.”
Generations OB/GYN has long been serving the health care needs of women in the Yakima Valley, providing attentive, compassionate and skillful care, and improving the quality of local obstetric and gynecologic care. Generations is also committed to educating and training new physicians with the goal of attracting more high-quality health care providers to the Yakima Valley.
“Our physicians, providers and staff are excited to be associated with Virginia Mason Memorial because we share the same philosophies of patient-centered medical care and continued efforts to bring the best possible care to the Yakima Valley,” said Dr. Kevin Harrington, a founding partner of Generations.

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Virginia Mason Memorial, part of the Virginia Mason Health System, is a 226-bed, acute-care, nonprofit, community hospital serving Central Washington’s Yakima Valley. Virginia Mason Memorial includes primary care practices and specialty care services including high-quality cardiac care; cancer care through North Star Lodge; breast health at `Ohana Mammography Center; acute hospice and respite care at Cottage in the Meadow, winner of the Circle of Life Award from the American Hospital Association for innovative palliative and end-of-life care; pain management at Water’s Edge; an advanced NICU unit, the only place in Central Washington that offers specialty care for at-risk infants; advanced services for children with special health care needs at Children’s Village; and The Memorial Foundation, a separate 501c(3) organization that raises funds for innovative health care programs in the Yakima Valley (www.memfound.org).

Visit Virginia Mason Memorial online at www.yakimamemorial.org or on Facebook (www.facebook.com/yakimavalleymemorialhospital), Twitter (www.twitter.com/Yakima_Memorial) or Pinterest (www.pinterest.com/yvmh).

How long can Flu live on objects?

The flu virus can “live” on some surfaces such as doorknobs and tables for up to 24 hours. Routine cleaning of surfaces may reduce the spread of flu.  Pay special attention to these germ collectors:

  • Telephones.
  • Remote controls and game controllers.
  • Counters, handles and drawer pulls in the bathroom.
  • All tables, including nightstands, coffee tables and desks.
  • Computers, tablets and keyboards.
  • Stuffed animals should be washed in the laundry, or kept away from others for several days until viruses die.
  • Sheets, blankets, towels should be washed at high temperature with color-safe bleach detergent.

Remember! Everyone should clean their hands with soap and water or hand sanitizers at LEAST six times per day.

Learn more information about identifying, avoiding and managing flu here https://www.rightcareyakima.com/index.asp

Get control over Flu!

Flu can make you feel bad for 2 to 7 days. You may feel like you are over it one day and sick again on the next day.  It is best to stay away from others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.  How can you manage flu?

  • Rest and drink plenty of fluids.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze and throw the tissue in the trash immediately.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects to kill flu germs.
  • Stay home until you are better! Stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone -without the use of fever-reducing medicine.

Is Flu dangerous?  Learn the signs here.  https://www.rightcareyakima.com/get-control-over-flu.asp

Health Tip of the Week

Did you know that 75 percent of the sodium we eat comes from packaged and restaurant foods?  So what can you? A well balanced healthy diet can still include amounts of sodium, the trick is to keep it in balance.  Try these tips.

  • When you are shopping for packaged or prepared foods, look at the labels and choose the product with the lowest amount of sodium (per serving).  The same food in another brand can have lower sodium.
  • Sometimes poultry has been injected with a sodium solution. Look for terms like “broth,” “saline” or “sodium solution”.
  • Try to find low or reduced sodium salad dressings, salsas, and olives as well as sauces like ketchup and mustard.  These types of condiments are usually high in sodium
  • If you buy canned or frozen vegetables, get the kind with no added salt or sauce.

It may take a while to get used to the taste of lower sodium in your meals.  Pick a few places to start and gradually change your ingredients.  Your heart will thank you for it!

View our previous heath tip »

Virginia Mason Memorial consolidates services for patients into one convenient downtown location

Virginia Mason Memorial consolidates services for patients into one convenient downtown location

 

 

 

 

 

YAKIMA (Dec. 22, 2016) – Virginia Mason Memorial is relocating three departments serving patients to one centralized location at the hospital’s downtown building, located at 15 W. Yakima Ave. The move will also bring about 200 employees to the downtown core.

Previously, the nonclinical services and business offices – Medical Records, Hospital Business Services and Memorial Physicians Business Services – were housed separately throughout the community.

“After a year of planning and preparation, we are excited to bring our business office and other support service operations to our downtown location,” said Jim Aberle, Virginia Mason Memorial’s chief operating officer. “This new location provides us the opportunity to consolidate services and allows for future growth.  The move will help free up space and parking at the hospital and at our Memorial Physicians administrative building at 3800 Summitview Ave.  We also believe this move is good for both Virginia Mason Memorial and the vitality of downtown Yakima.”

Virginia Mason Memorial purchased the 85,000-square-foot building, once a fruit-packing facility, earlier this year and has been working since then to update and renovate the space.

The services and opening dates, which are staggered, are:

  • Business Services, where patients can pay hospital bills, will open at the new location
    on Jan. 4.

    • The office is moving from 3803 W. Nob Hill Blvd.
    • The phone number remains: 509-575-8255.
    • Patients can also pay hospital bills online at org/payyourbill.
  • Memorial Physicians Business Services, billing for outpatient, most primary care clinics and specialty clinics, opens Jan. 10.
    • The office is moving from 3800 Summitview Ave.
    • The phone number remains 509-972-1140.
    • Patients can also pay these bills at yakimamp.com.
  • Medical Records, where patients can get copies of their medical records, opens Jan. 16.
    • The office is moving from the hospital’s main campus at 2811 Tieton Drive.
    • The phone number remains 509-575-8082.

Hours of operation at 15 W. Yakima Ave. will be 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

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Tips for walking around on icy/snowy surfaces

Tips for walking around on icy/snowy surfaces

Snow is one thing, but streets, sidewalks and parking lots coated in sheets of ice are another, as we experienced earlier this week! One hospital employee carries kitty litter in her car, not just for tire traction if needed, but to scatter on icy pathways for walking.

That’s just one way to walk safely on slick surfaces. Below are some tips for walking in icy conditions from the Snow & Ice Management Association, a nonprofit group representing the snow removal industry.

  • Wear proper footwear. Wear shoes with heavy treading and a flat bottom that place the entire foot on the surface of the ground.
    Also, you can attach a pair of Yaktrax Walk Traction Cleats to the bottom of any flat shoe or boot. The slip-on cleats, with steel coils, greatly reduce the risk of falls. Find them online for less than $20.
  • Wear things that help you see and be seen. Wear sunglasses so you can see. Also, bright and reflective clothing help you be seen by drivers.
  • Plan ahead. Walk consciously on icy sidewalks and parking lots. Look up to see where the next icy spots are and be aware of any vehicles near you.
  • Listen. Avoid listening to music or talking on the phone while walking in icy or snowy conditions. Pedestrians need to be able to hear approaching traffic or other noises.
  • Anticipate ice. What appears to be wet pavement may be black ice, so approach it with caution. Ice will often appear in the mornings, so be more aware in the early hours.
  • Take steps slowly. When walking down steps, take them slowly and deliberately. Plant your feet in a wide-legged stance securely on each step and be sure to have a firm grip on the handrail.
  • Enter buildings slowly. The floors of buildings may be covered in melted snow and ice, so check the entrance and try to step on any rugs in the doorways.
  • Avoid shortcuts. A shortcut path may be dangerous because it is less likely that snow and ice removal occurred.

Memorial Hospital rebrands to reflect affiliation with Virginia Mason Health System

November 2, 2016

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Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital rebrands to reflect affiliation with Virginia Mason Health System

YAKIMA — After more than 60 years of serving the Yakima Valley community as Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital, the hospital and its primary and specialty care clinics have become Virginia Mason Memorial. This new name and brand reflect Memorial’s affiliation with innovative health-care leader Virginia Mason Health System
in Seattle.
Memorial and Virginia Mason affiliated on Jan. 1, 2016. Ever since, teams from both sides of the mountains have been working to combine and streamline care and services. In choosing the new name it was vital that Memorial continue to have a strong identity as the trusted health-care provider and also a prominent economic engine for the Yakima Valley community and in the Central Washington region.

The creation of a health-care system with a local presence in each community — where patients receive the same high-quality, coordinated care at Memorial in Yakima or Virginia Mason in Seattle — was a primary focus for the integration. Also, the affiliation is bringing more resources (physicians, nursing education, best practices in care, expansion of surgical and specialty care) eastward. Virginia Mason Memorial is also working to adopt the Virginia Mason Production system, the internationally recognized method of quality and service improvement that focuses on patients.

About Virginia Mason Memorial
Virginia Mason Memorial, part of the Virginia Mason Health System, is a 226-bed, acute-care, nonprofit, community hospital serving Central Washington’s Yakima Valley. Virginia Mason Memorial includes primary care practices and specialty care services including high-quality cardiac care; cancer care through North Star Lodge; breast health at `Ohana Mammography Center; acute hospice and respite care at Cottage in the Meadow, winner of the Circle of Life Award from the American Hospital Association for innovative palliative and end-of-life care; pain management at Water’s Edge; an advanced NICU unit, the only place in Central Washington that offers specialty care for at-risk infants; advanced services for children with special health care needs at Children’s Village; and The Memorial Foundation, a separate 501c(3) organization that raises funds for innovative health care programs in the Yakima Valley (www.memfound.org).
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Visit Memorial online at www.yakimamemorial.org or on Facebook (www.facebook.com/yakimavalleymemorialhospital), Twitter (www.twitter.com/Yakima_Memorial) or Pinterest (www.pinterest.com/yvmh).

Seattle-based Virginia Mason Health System is a nonprofit regional health care system that includes 336-bed Virginia Mason Hospital; Virginia Mason Memorial in Yakima; medical centers in Seattle, Bainbridge Island, Bellevue, Federal Way, Kirkland, Issaquah and Lynnwood; Bailey-Boushay House, the first skilled-nursing and outpatient chronic care management program in the U.S. designed for people with HIV/AIDS; Benaroya Research Institute, which is internationally recognized for autoimmune disease research; and the Virginia Mason Institute, which trains health care professionals and others from around the world in the Virginia Mason Production System, an innovative management methodology for continually improving quality, safety and efficiency. Virginia Mason online: www.VirginiaMason.org

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