Category Archives: News

Great Places to be a nurse: Yakima – Eric’s Story

Find out why you should be part of the Virginia Mason Memorial team>>

A 2016 study (link) rated Washington State the best in which to be a nurse Hear why Eric is dedicated to the Yakima Valley and find out why you should consider joining the Virginia Mason Memorial team.  Part of the Virginia Mason Health System, Virginia Mason Memorial is a 226-bed acute-care, nonprofit community hospital that has served Central Washington’s Yakima valley for more than 60 years. Services also include primary and specialty care practices.

How do you know if it’s Cold or Flu?

Because colds and flu share many symptoms, it can be difficult (or even impossible) to tell the difference between them.  The symptoms of flu can include fever or feeling feverish/chills, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches and fatigue (tiredness). Cold symptoms are usually milder than the symptoms of flu. People with colds are more likely to have a runny or stuffy nose. Learn more about Flu at https://www.rightcareyakima.com

Great Places to be a nurse: Yakima

Find out why you should be part of the Virginia Mason Memorial team>>

A 2016 study (link) rated Washington State the best in which to be a nurse. Learn more about being a nurse in Yakima, Washington from Anna , a nurse at Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital. Watch as she discusses her job, the area and her love of the activities available to her and her family throughout the year.

Anna’s Story

Hear why Anna is dedicated to the Yakima Valley and find out why you should consider joining the Virginia Mason Memorial team. Part of the Virginia Mason Health System, Virginia Mason Memorial is a 226-bed acute-care, nonprofit community hospital that has served Central Washington’s Yakima valley for more than 60 years. Services also include primary and specialty care practices

How will you know Flu?

Influenza (also known as the flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by flu viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The flu is different from a cold. The flu usually comes on suddenly. People who have the flu often have a fever, cough, sore throat and headache, plus feel overly tired.  Learn how to manage flu symptoms at https://www.rightcareyakima.com

Memorial Hospital rebrands to reflect affiliation with Virginia Mason Health System

November 2, 2016

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Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital rebrands to reflect affiliation with Virginia Mason Health System

YAKIMA — After more than 60 years of serving the Yakima Valley community as Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital, the hospital and its primary and specialty care clinics have become Virginia Mason Memorial. This new name and brand reflect Memorial’s affiliation with innovative health-care leader Virginia Mason Health System
in Seattle.
Memorial and Virginia Mason affiliated on Jan. 1, 2016. Ever since, teams from both sides of the mountains have been working to combine and streamline care and services. In choosing the new name it was vital that Memorial continue to have a strong identity as the trusted health-care provider and also a prominent economic engine for the Yakima Valley community and in the Central Washington region.

The creation of a health-care system with a local presence in each community — where patients receive the same high-quality, coordinated care at Memorial in Yakima or Virginia Mason in Seattle — was a primary focus for the integration. Also, the affiliation is bringing more resources (physicians, nursing education, best practices in care, expansion of surgical and specialty care) eastward. Virginia Mason Memorial is also working to adopt the Virginia Mason Production system, the internationally recognized method of quality and service improvement that focuses on patients.

About Virginia Mason Memorial
Virginia Mason Memorial, part of the Virginia Mason Health System, is a 226-bed, acute-care, nonprofit, community hospital serving Central Washington’s Yakima Valley. Virginia Mason Memorial includes primary care practices and specialty care services including high-quality cardiac care; cancer care through North Star Lodge; breast health at `Ohana Mammography Center; acute hospice and respite care at Cottage in the Meadow, winner of the Circle of Life Award from the American Hospital Association for innovative palliative and end-of-life care; pain management at Water’s Edge; an advanced NICU unit, the only place in Central Washington that offers specialty care for at-risk infants; advanced services for children with special health care needs at Children’s Village; and The Memorial Foundation, a separate 501c(3) organization that raises funds for innovative health care programs in the Yakima Valley (www.memfound.org).
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Visit Memorial online at www.yakimamemorial.org or on Facebook (www.facebook.com/yakimavalleymemorialhospital), Twitter (www.twitter.com/Yakima_Memorial) or Pinterest (www.pinterest.com/yvmh).

Seattle-based Virginia Mason Health System is a nonprofit regional health care system that includes 336-bed Virginia Mason Hospital; Virginia Mason Memorial in Yakima; medical centers in Seattle, Bainbridge Island, Bellevue, Federal Way, Kirkland, Issaquah and Lynnwood; Bailey-Boushay House, the first skilled-nursing and outpatient chronic care management program in the U.S. designed for people with HIV/AIDS; Benaroya Research Institute, which is internationally recognized for autoimmune disease research; and the Virginia Mason Institute, which trains health care professionals and others from around the world in the Virginia Mason Production System, an innovative management methodology for continually improving quality, safety and efficiency. Virginia Mason online: www.VirginiaMason.org

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Five Tips for breast health

There is no guaranteed way to prevent breast cancer.   There are some risk factors such as family history and aging that are unavoidable.  But!  Good news!  There are some risk factors that you can control and they will improve your overall health in the process.   Ask yourself these questions:

  1. Am I at a healthy weight? Obesity or being overweight can increase your breast cancer risk and losing just 7 % of your body weight can dramatically change your health for the better. If your weight is healthy, keep up the good work!
  2. Do I exercise regularly? Studies show that brisk walking just 2 hours per week can reduce a woman’s risk of breast cancer up to 18%. Start a new habit, step out with your friends to explore your neighborhood parks and walking paths.
  3. Can I minimize or avoid my alcohol consumption? Women who have 2 to 5 alcoholic drinks daily have a higher risk of breast cancer.  This is especially important for women who have breast cancer in their families.
  4. Do I smoke? -even on occasion?  The risk of many cancers and other health problems increases if you smoke. Research shows that long-term smoking is specifically associated with increased risk of breast cancer.
  5. Do I eat enough veggies? Eating a diet rich in cruciferous vegetables is your best defense for fighting and preventing cancer.  Examples are cauliflower, bok choy, garden cress, brussel sprouts cabbage, broccoli, and other green leafy vegetables.

There are resources in your community to help with lifestyle changes and learning healthy habits.  Learn more here

https://www.yakimamemorial.org/medical-services-community-education.asp

Workshop helps children who are grieving the death of a loved one

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Rebecca Teagarden, Memorial Communications: (509) 577-5051

Workshop helps children who are grieving the death of a loved one

Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital is offering a hands-on workshop on Sunday, May 15, to help guide children ages 4 to 17 and their parents or guardians through the grief associated with the death of a loved one. The workshop offers children the opportunity to express their feelings and thoughts through creative activities and to meet others who have experienced a similar loss.

While children at the workshop are participating in activities to assist their recovery, parents and guardians will be involved in a grief recovery program geared for adults.

There is no charge for the workshop, which will be held from noon to 2:30 p.m. at Children’s Village, 3801 Kern Road, Yakima. Lunch will be provided. To register, contact Joyce Scott at JoyceScott@yvmh.org or 509-577-5062.

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Grief workshops are made possible by community donations to The Memorial Foundation and through Memorial Hospice, the Memorial Small Grant Program, Memorial’s Spiritual Care Program and Children’s Village.

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