Category Archives: Video

Five Wishes is more than a living will

Five Wishes is more than a living will. It lets you choose the person you want to make health care decisions for you if you are not able to make them for yourself. It lets you say exactly how you wish to be treated if you get seriously ill. It’s easy to use – all you have to do is check a box, circle a direction or write a few sentences. And it’s recognized in 42 states – including Washington – and the District of Columbia.

Memorial is holding seminars to help people in our community complete the 5 Wishes advance directive:

  • Tuesday, April 28, 7:30 a.m. (Classroom B) and noon (Memorial auditorium)
  • Tuesday, May 5, 7:30 a.m. and noon (auditorium)
  • Wednesday, May 13, 7:30 a.m. and noon (auditorium)

 

Memorial Chaplain Laurie Oswalt appeared on KIT 1280 on April 21, 2015, to discuss the 5 Wishes and encourage people to attend these seminars.

 

So what are the five wishes?

Wish No. 1: Who do you want to make health care decisions for you when you can’t make them for yourself?

This allows you to designate a durable power of attorney, which is legal in Washington. Choose someone who knows you very well, cares about you and who can make difficult decisions. A spouse or family member may not be the best choice because they are too emotionally involved. Sometimes, they are the BEST choice. It depends on the situation. But choose someone who is able to stand up for you so that your wishes are followed.

 

Wish No. 2 is your wish for the kind of medical treatment you want or don’t want.

Wish No. 2 is the living will that describes acceptable and unacceptable medical treatment. Life support treatment means any medical procedure, device or medication to keep you alive. It includes medical devices to help breathe, food and water supplied by tube, CPR, major surgery, blood transfusions, antibiotics and anything else meant to keep you alive. This wish allows you to choose if you want life-support treatment, if you don’t want it or want it stopped if it has been started, or if you want it only if your doctor believes it could help your condition.

Another two-page form allows you to summarize your wishes for end-of-life treatment, to be kept in your file for the future. The Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment – or POLST form – lists a set of medical orders that are intended to guide emergency medical treatment for people with advanced illness.

Wish No. 3 is your wish for how comfortable you want to be.

Do you want your doctor to administer medicine to relieve your pain? Do you want your caregivers to do whatever they can to help you if you show signs of depressions, nausea, shortness of breath or hallucinations? Do you want your lips and mouth kept moist to stop dryness? Do you want religious readings and well-loved poems read aloud when you are near death?

This is about exactly what it says: making you as comfortable as you want to be when you are near the end of your life.

Wish No. 4 is your wish for how you want people to treat you.

Do you want people with you? Do you want to have your hand held, even if you don’t seem to respond to the voice or touch of others? Do you want people nearby praying for you? Do you want to die at home?

Wish No. 5 is to ensure your loved ones know what you want them to know when your time is near.

You wish for your family and friends to know that you love them, and for them to respect your wishes even if they don’t agree with them. You want them to respect your choice to be buried or cremated.

 

 

Couch to 5K

So, you’ve spent the winter months curled up on the couch watching television. Now, you’re ready to get outside and start exercising.

Jeff Yamada, Memorial Vice President and Chief Information Officer, started running a few years ago and now is an avid marathoner. He’s here today to offer tips for getting started – a couch to 5K plan – and Joel Buffum of Memorial Sports Medicine Advantage has some reminders for avoiding injuries.

What are the benefits of a couch to 5K plan?

  • Daily exercise – lose weight, gain energy
  • Eating healthy whole foods – food as fuel
  • Find a friend or group – meeting new friends, go to new places
  • Have fun!

Jeff’s tips: Find your motivation. Pick a goal and sign up for a race. Keep it consistent and keep it fun.

How to avoid injury:

It’s best to follow FITT principles: Frequency, Intensity, Time and Type.

  • If you’re not familiar with running a 5k start by loading up endurance to activity with walking a 5k, and gradually introducing running to the load.
  • The actual movement of running is more ballistic that walking so make sure to integrate strengthening/stretching techniques of the ankle, knee and hip to prevent compensations. Stretch before and after each run.
  • Don’t push too hard; let yourself recover. If you are intentionally pushing yourself hard on Monday, be aware that it isn’t realistic to push yourself equally hard or harder on Tuesday. Mix up your intensities/times to prevent injury and stagnation.

Are their special shoes you to buy?

There are hundreds of different athletic shoes, with many different purposes, made by people with different perspectives on purpose. If you goal is to run, purchase a stable running shoe for your needs. “Cool” shoes aren’t always good running shoes. Consult an expert if you can’t find what you need.

  • But take care of your feet! A hot spot is a blister waiting for you to look the other way. Blisters make running NOT FUN!

What’s the biggest mistake people make?

People need to know their limitations.

  • A perfect running gait is as rare as a perfect swing/pitch/lift/etc. Train to the limits of your current abilities, with a structured training program, and use the proper tools that work for you. Pushing yourself as hard as possible while developing compensations may allow you to get an extra mile in today, but in the long term can lead to overuse injuries, and then you end up with me. (Joel)

Remember to hydrate! And remember, no matter how slow you go, you’re lapping everyone on the couch.

The Importance of Cardiac Rehab

February is National Heart Month. Kristy Little, nurse manager at Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital’s Cardiac Rehabilitation Center, talks more about the importance of cardiac rehab following a heart attack during a Feb. 17, 2015 appearance on KIT 1280.

What is cardiac rehab?

Cardiac rehabilitation is a medically supervised program of exercise, education and support for people with heart disease to restore good health and improve their quality of life.  It is meant to reduce the chance of future cardiac problems and helps people live life to its fullest.  The work is done by the patient.

Who benefits?

According to the American Heart Association, cardiac rehab can help people who’ve had:

  • A heart attack
  • Coronary artery disease
  • Heart failure
  • Angina
  • A heart procedure, such as a balloon angioplasty or a pacemaker implant
  • Heart surgery, such as a bypass operation or valve replacement
  • GETTING PEOPLE TO TAKE PERSONAL RESPONSIBIILTY FOR THEIR OWN HEALTH INVOLVES BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION.  IT’S NOT EASY, BUT IT CAN BE DONE, ONE STEP AT A TIME.

 

Where do people get treated?

Cardiac rehab may take place at the hospital or in another location.

  • Memorial’s Cardiac Rehab program is located on South 30th Avenue across the street from the hospital in the West Pavilion Two building, on the second floor above the offices of the Yakima Heart Center.
  • The program may last a few weeks or up to a year, although three months is common
  • Medicare and health plans often cover the cost for the first two or three months
  • You must be referred by a health care provider.

 

What happens at rehab?

The rehab team will evaluate your overall health, lifestyle, medical conditions and limitations. Then they’ll tailor a program just for you. In rehab you may:

  • Work with a nutritionist to set up a heart-healthy eating plan
  • Learn how to exercise safely, possibly using a treadmill, bike, rowing machine, track or weight machines
  • Learn how to control chronic health conditions, such as diabetes or high blood pressure
  • Learn ways to reduce stress
  • Learn about your medications and how to take them
  • Get tips for quitting smoking and losing weight
  • Get counseling about returning to work and to activities you enjoy
  • You’ll meet others who’ve been through a similar life event. That camaraderie can help you stick with your program and make the transition back to an active life.
  • Rehab also is a place to find help for the emotional upheaval that is common after heart surgery or heart problems. Depression, anxiety and anger shouldn’t be ignored. They can affect you physically and keep you from recovering.

For more information, visit  call 576-7650.

Memorial is partnering with Kohl’s Department Stores to bring you Healthy for Life

In Yakima County, about one in every three adults is obese, and Yakima County has consistently exceeded Washington state rates for adult obesity.

Memorial Family of Services has worked for years to improve access to care and educate the community about obesity and chronic diseases that are prevalent in our community, including diabetes, offering comprehensive diabetes education and prevention programs and a nutrition and fitness education program for at-risk children and their families, among other programs.

 

Now, Memorial is partnering with Kohl’s Department Stores to bring you Healthy for Life, a new program of exercise and cooking classes, offered in Yakima at no cost to participants. Memorial Community Health Educator Juanita Silva talked more about the classes Feb. 3, 2015 on KIT 1280.

 

What classes are available thank to this partnership?

 

  • Gentle Yoga

Tuesdays, 7:15-8:15 p.m.

Yoga Collective, 2600 W. Nob Hill Blvd.

 

  • Zumba – This is a bilingual English/Spanish class

Wednesdays, starting Feb. 18, 6-7 p.m.

Adams Elementary School, 723 S. 8th St.

 

  • Bilingual Yoga

Thursdays, 7:30-8:30 p.m.

Yoga Collective, 2600 W. Nob Hill Blvd.

 

  • Boot Camp

Fridays, 5:30-6:15 p.m.

Rock Solid Fitness, 1109 S. 22nd Ave., Unit B,

 

  • We also will be offering cooking classes in June and July at Memorial’s Education Center. Stay tuned for more information on these classes closer to those dates.

 

How is this all possible?

Kohl’s donated more than $28,000 to Memorial to make this program possible. This grant also allows once again for the purchase of 1,000 bike helmets for area children to be distributed at various events, including Memorial’s annual Fiesta de Salud Health Fair this summer.

 

Since 2012, Kohl’s has donated more than $45,000 to Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital and The Memorial Foundation. Other Memorial initiatives supported through Kohl’s include Children’s Village, YouthWorks and other child safety programs through community education

 

Where can I find more information about health and wellness classes in Yakima?

For more information, yakimamemorial.org/healthyforlife.

 

Do you know a child who is grieving the loss of a parent or other close loved one?

Do you know a child who is grieving the loss of a parent or other close loved one? Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital is offering a hands-on workshop to help guide children ages 4-17 and their parents or guardians through the grief associated with death. Memorial Chaplain Laurie Oswalt appeared on KIT 1280 on Jan. 27, 2015, to talk more about the upcoming workshop.

 

The workshop will provide an opportunity for children to express their feelings and thoughts through creative activities and meet others who have experienced a similar loss. While children are participating in activities to assist their recovery, parents and guardians will be involved in their own grief recovery program geared for adults.

 

Key points about grieving children:

  • Every kid grieves differently. There is no right or wrong way to grieve.
  • Can be feelings of anger, sadness, worry, relief, fear or numbness.

 

How a child or teen grieves varies depending on a number of factors:

  • what social support systems are available – family or friends
  • the circumstances of the death – how, when and where the person died
  • the nature of the relationship with the person who died – harmonious or conflicted
  • the child or teen’s involvement in the dying process
  • previous experiences with death

 

This workshop is intended to help children and teens work through these feelings and safely share them in a safe environment. Activities include writing, drawing, team-building and art.

 

This workshop will be held:

 

Sunday, Feb. 8, 2015

11:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Children’s Village, 3801 Kern Road, Yakima

 

Lunch will be provided for every family, and parents are encouraged to enjoy lunch with the children before the activities begin. This workshop is provided at no charge to participants.

 

For more information or to register, contact Denise Mitzel at 577-5062 or DeniseMitzel@yvmh.org.

 

Registrations will be accepted until Friday, Feb. 6.

Tips for knowing if you have flu…

It’s definitely flu season. Dr. Tanny Davenport of Memorial’s Healthy You Clinic offered tips Jan. 6, 2015 on KIT 1280 for knowing if you or your loved ones have the flu, how to treat it, and whether the illness warrants a trip to the doctor’s office or the hospital Emergency Room.

What are the symptoms of flu?

You may have the flu if you have some or all of these symptoms:

fever – though it’s important to note that not everyone with flu will have a fever

cough
sore throat
runny or stuffy nose
body aches
headache
chills
fatigue
sometimes diarrhea and vomiting

How should I treat the flu?

The best way to treat flu: stay at home and rest. Avoid close contact with people in your house so you won’t make them sick. Wash your hands frequently and drink plenty of water and other clear liquids to prevent dehydration. Treat fever and cough with medicines you can buy at the store.

When is flu serious enough that I should seek medical attention?

Most people with the flu have mild illness and do not need medical care. Generally, if you get sick with flu symptoms, you should stay home and avoid contact with other people to avoid spreading the illness.

Some people are at high risk of serious, flu-related complications. They include young children, people age 65 and older, pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions. If you or someone you love is at high risk, or you start to experience more serious symptoms, contact your primary care provider.

What are some of those symptoms?

For children, it’s a concern when they have fast breathing or trouble breathing, when they are not waking up or interacting, of if they’re so irritable that they do not want to be held.

Other symptoms:

  • bluish skin color
  • not drinking enough fluids, unable to eat
  • flu-like symptoms improve, but then return with fever and worse cough
  • fever with a rash

In adults, it’s a concern when they have difficulty breathing or shortness of breath, pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen, sudden dizziness, confusion, severe or persistent vomiting, and flu-like symptoms that improve but then return with fever and worse cough.

Do I need to go the emergency room if I am only a little sick?

The emergency room should be used for people who are very sick, not if you are only mildly ill. If you get sick with flu symptoms and are at high risk of flu complications or if your symptoms worsen – such as difficulty breathing and some of the other symptoms we mentioned – then it’s time to seek medical attention.

How long should I stay home if I’m sick?

CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or other necessities. Your fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine, such as Tylenol®. You should stay home from work, school, travel, shopping, social events, and public gatherings.

Frequently asked questions:

How do I know if my child needs to go to the doctor or emergency room?

Parents should make some simple notes tracking the child’s condition, and if you think you’re dealing with an emergency, contact your pediatrician or primary care provider.

If I think my child requires medical attention because of the flu, what information should I have for my pediatrician?

Things to look for include your child’s temperature and when the fever began, a detailed list of any medications you have provided, the last time your child had something to eat and drink, how often the child is vomiting or experiencing diarrhea, and the last time the child went to the bathroom or the last wet diaper.

Are there doctors on call to answer questions after regular business hours?

Every medical clinic has someone to answer questions in the middle of the night or on weekends. Please contact your primary care provider to find out how to get in touch with that person for questions.

 

Dr. Gabriel Lascar talks about Cornerstone’s new clinic.

Memorial Cornerstone Medicine has been treating Yakima Valley patients for more than 30 years and has a rich history of serving this community. Cornerstone is excited to be located at a new clinic, designed to better serve patients. Dr. Gabriel Lascar appeared on KIT 1280 on Dec. 16, 2014, to talk more about the new clinic.

How has the patient population at Cornerstone changed?

Cornerstone’s patients tend to be older. It’s a population that tends to have many chronic conditions, and caring for these patients requires a great deal of “behind the scenes” coordination. As health care changes, we need to be better situated to address the needs of these patients, as well as those who require less coordination.

How will this clinic enable you to do that?

We are very excited to be moving to a new clinic that has been built to allow us to better serve our patients into the future. It’s a purpose-built facility – meaning that it is designed to better meet the needs of our patients. The design allows for services to be brought directly to the patient.

  • The building is all on one floor – no elevator and no stairs.
  • There’s more parking and close to a bus stop right outside.
  • The new clinic is all about convenience for our patients.  We literally counted the steps from the clinic entry to the exam room to minimize the number of steps a patient takes once they come into the clinic.  Patients will receive care that is integrated, more efficient and comfortable.
  • In patient satisfaction surveys, one frequent complaint we heard was that patients don’t like having to wait in crowded, noisy waiting rooms.  To address this, we downsized the space in the waiting rooms and created exam rooms that are 40 percent larger to accommodate wheelchairs, walkers and family members or caregivers. From the check-in process to check-out, all of the services will occur in the exam room.
  • In addition, there are additional on-site services to better serve patients.

What are some of the services that will be offered at the new clinic that patients currently don’t have?

Services being offered at the new clinic will include:

  • Full service retail pharmacy, including a drive-through pharmacy that serves Cornerstone patients
  • Anti-coagulation management clinic
  • Lab draw station
  • Dietitians on site
  • Behaviorist on site
  • Diabetes education program also on site.

Eating Healthy at the Holidays

Eating healthy at the holidays can be a struggle for anyone – people bring holiday cookies to work, there’s an office party seemingly every day and family get-togethers center on food. It’s especially difficult for people trying to watch their weight or lose weight. Katie Wolff, Memorial dietician, offered tips for eating healthy at the holidays Dec. 2, 2014 on KIT 1280.

How do I manage holiday parties?

  • Get involved. There’s usually a sign-up list for coworkers to volunteer to bring dishes. You can sign up to bring one healthy dish, giving yourself and everyone else at least one good option to enjoy.
  • Come prepared. If the party is during lunch, eat a healthy breakfast and plan for a healthy, mid-morning snack, such as an apple or a protein bar.
  • Use a small plate. You’ll eat less.
  • Plan your attack. Don’t load up your plate with foods that are fried or high in fat, such as those with a lot of cheese or cream. Fill half your plate with fresh fruits and veggies, and devote ¼ of your plate to starches and ¼ to proteins. Also, be sure to control your portion sizes.

What about desserts?

There are healthy dessert options that allow you to indulge your sweet tooth.

  • Look for yogurt and fruit. Dip fruits, such as strawberries or bananas, in chocolate to satisfy a sweet tooth and get that hint of chocolate.
  • Substitute unsweetened applesauce for oil or butter, or for sugar.
  • Share a dessert – splitting one in half allows you to enjoy it with half the guilt.

A few basic tips for healthy eating at the holidays:

  • Control portion sizes.
  • Find creative ways to make modifications where you can.
  • Forgo those treats that aren’t your favorites. Hold out for your favorites so that you can still enjoy your traditions at the holidays.

And with healthy eating, come a few other things your body needs to stay healthy at the holidays.

  • Get plenty of exercise.
  • Get plenty of sleep.
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Plan ahead to manage your stress.

For more tips on healthy eating, visit yakimamemorial.org or choosemyplate.gov.

Thank you Yakima…

The Memorial Family of Services relies on community support for many of its programs. Anne Caffery, president of The Memorial Foundation, appeared on KIT 1280 on Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014, to thank the Yakima community for its generous support and to highlight the Foundation’s philanthropic accomplishments and highlights in the past year and the year ahead.

In 2014, generous contributions to the Foundation enabled Memorial to:

  • Expand the Diabetes Initiative with diabetes prevention and diabetes education classes, offered both in English and Spanish.
  • Buy a new incubator for the NICU
  • Serve hundreds of families through our Transitions Program, offering palliative care for anyone with a life-limiting illness, and through our Hospice programs, including Cottage in the Meadow hospice home.
  • Continue to provide critical care for children with special needs at Children’s Village.

Last year, we took guidance from our Community Health Initiative – and from past patterns of requests – to determine areas of greatest need in our community. We are focusing our efforts on four major initiatives going forward.

The following shows the total dollar figure awarded by the Foundation for 2015 in each of those four major initiatives and a couple of highlights for each:

  • Improving Children’s Health – $716,873
    • Continued support for critical Children’s Village programs
    • Creation of a Pediatrics simulation lab and training center
  • Advancing Cancer Care – $242,400
    • North Star Lodge services, including support and education programs, pharmacy, dietary, rehabilitation services
    • Mammography scholarships for women in need
    • Creation of a survivorship program
  • Supporting End of Life – $233,000
    • Continued support for Cottage in the Meadow hospice home and the Transitions palliative care program, which we intend to grow in the future
    • Improved efforts for Hispanic/Latino outreach
  • Healthy Yakima – $769,538
    • Support for Alzheimer’s and dementia conference to better educate our community about this disease – both physicians and caregivers – and to provide vital support
    • Continued support of our ACT! program to address childhood obesity
  • General, Fundraising, Grants – $238,324

TOTAL = $2,200,135 – Total money allocated by The Memorial Foundation for 2015.

Thank you, Yakima!

 

Are you at risk for Breast Cancer?

It’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month! Dr. Vicky Jones, medical oncologist at North Star Lodge Cancer Care Center, and genetic counselor Susie Ball appeared on KIT 1280 on Oct. 14, 2014, to discuss breast cancer risks and genetic screening.

Memorial provides a continuum of cancer care, from screening and diagnosis through treatment and survivorship. Your support for cancer care services in this community stays local, so visit keepsupportlocal.org to make a contribution today.

About 1 in 8 women in the United States will develop invasive breast cancer during their lifetimes – more than a quarter million women estimated this year. Roughly 40,000 women die from the disease annually, making it the second leading cause of cancer death in women behind lung cancer, according to the American Cancer Society.

Actress Angelina Jolie grabbed headlines last year for her announcement that she had undergone a double mastectomy after testing positive for a genetic mutation that increased her risk for breast and ovarian cancer.

  • Recent studies show that Jolie’s decision, now dubbed the “Angelina Effect,” resulted in a surge in women in the United Kingdom and Canada undergoing genetic tests for breast cancer in the months since. Researchers also found that it was women with a family history of breast cancer who were being appropriately referred for additional screening.

However, most women with breast cancer do not have a family history of the disease. Only 5-10 percent of those cancers are inherited, and sometimes, the fact that Aunt Betty had cancer doesn’t necessarily mean her niece will develop any cancer, let alone the same cancer.

So when does “a family history” mean you should undergo genetic testing?

The key to genetic testing: genetic counseling. Any woman who believes she may have inherited a gene mutation and be at higher risk could benefit from genetic counseling. Ultimately, a counselor can help to determine whether screening is necessary, which test or tests to perform, and help to ensure it’s paid for by insurance. Most insurance policies will cover genetic testing if it’s documented as worthwhile.

What factors does a genetic counselor consider when reviewing a cancer patient’s case?

Genetic counselors consider several factors, including:

  • the type of cancer (whether it’s the same cancer the family member experienced)
  • unusual cases, such as a male family member with breast cancer
  • bilateral cancer, meaning the cancer is in both breasts or in both ovaries
  • early age of onset

Women who inherit the gene change have a higher chance that they will get cancer than other people, but that doesn’t mean they will get it. There isn’t any one breast cancer gene.

Does a gene mutation change how cancer is treated?

If a gene is found to be abnormal, it doesn’t change how breast cancer is managed. It changes how frequently medical providers monitor for cancer in patients who are currently cancer-free, or how they monitor for new cancers in patients already diagnosed, she says.

What should women do in the meantime?

The most common risk factors for breast cancer are things that can’t be changed: being a woman, age and ethnicity. Women should continue their own due-diligence with self exams and mammograms to catch cancers early. And live a healthy lifestyle – maintain a healthy weight, get proper nutrition and exercise and limit alcohol.

For more information, visit northstarlodge.org or yakimamemorial.org. To contribute to local cancer care services, visit keepsupportlocal.org.