Tag Archives: Healthy Yakima

Tips for walking around on icy/snowy surfaces

Tips for walking around on icy/snowy surfaces

Snow is one thing, but streets, sidewalks and parking lots coated in sheets of ice are another, as we experienced earlier this week! One hospital employee carries kitty litter in her car, not just for tire traction if needed, but to scatter on icy pathways for walking.

That’s just one way to walk safely on slick surfaces. Below are some tips for walking in icy conditions from the Snow & Ice Management Association, a nonprofit group representing the snow removal industry.

  • Wear proper footwear. Wear shoes with heavy treading and a flat bottom that place the entire foot on the surface of the ground.
    Also, you can attach a pair of Yaktrax Walk Traction Cleats to the bottom of any flat shoe or boot. The slip-on cleats, with steel coils, greatly reduce the risk of falls. Find them online for less than $20.
  • Wear things that help you see and be seen. Wear sunglasses so you can see. Also, bright and reflective clothing help you be seen by drivers.
  • Plan ahead. Walk consciously on icy sidewalks and parking lots. Look up to see where the next icy spots are and be aware of any vehicles near you.
  • Listen. Avoid listening to music or talking on the phone while walking in icy or snowy conditions. Pedestrians need to be able to hear approaching traffic or other noises.
  • Anticipate ice. What appears to be wet pavement may be black ice, so approach it with caution. Ice will often appear in the mornings, so be more aware in the early hours.
  • Take steps slowly. When walking down steps, take them slowly and deliberately. Plant your feet in a wide-legged stance securely on each step and be sure to have a firm grip on the handrail.
  • Enter buildings slowly. The floors of buildings may be covered in melted snow and ice, so check the entrance and try to step on any rugs in the doorways.
  • Avoid shortcuts. A shortcut path may be dangerous because it is less likely that snow and ice removal occurred.

Dress up as your favorite superhero & run/walk to benefit local kids on Oct. 15

Dress up as your favorite superhero!
and run/walk to benefit local kids on Oct. 15

Ace Hardware is hosting a run/walk on Saturday, Oct. 15, to benefit Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals and participants are encouraged to dress up as their favorite superhero for the “Superheroes for Local Miracles!” 5K.

The event, sponsored by Ace and Les Schwab Tires, will be held at the Ace Hardware Distribution Center, 7702 Duffield Road, Moxee. Registration begins at 8 a.m., and the event begins at 9 a.m. The cost to enter, which includes a T-shirt, is $25 for adults and $15 for youth under age 16.

All donations stay local to fund critical treatments and health-care services, pediatric medical equipment and charitable care. Proceeds from this event benefit the Neo-Natal Intensive Care Unit and Pediatric Department at Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital, as well as programs and services at Children’s Village, which serves Central Washington children with special health care needs and their families.
Memorial is one of 170 nonprofit Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals that treat severely injured and ill children in the U.S. and Canada.

Memorial Foundation Receives $25,000 Walmart Foundation Grant

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  

Contact: Rebecca Teagarden, Memorial Communications, 509-577-5051

$25,000 grant from Walmart supports childhood obesity program
and classes that encourage healthy living in Yakima County

The Memorial Foundation has received a $25,000 grant from the Walmart Foundation to support the ACT! Get Up, Get Moving! childhood obesity program and the Kohl’s Healthy For Life program.  Both of these community education and wellness programs have seen significant growth in the past few years as Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital works to reduce Yakima County’s high rates of obesity and diabetes.

ACT! is an evidenced-based program offered through Memorial and the Yakima Valley YMCA that models nutrition recommendations and physical activities for families. The healthy lifestyle program is geared for overweight children and teens, ages 8-14, and their parents or guardians. Through the generous donation, Memorial plans to expand ACT! to reach 120 Hispanic children and their parents each year in the Lower Yakima Valley where no similar resources exist. ACT! will also continue to serve 136 children and parents annually in the Upper Yakima Valley.

The Kohl’s Healthy for Life program provides community-based cooking classes to encourage healthy eating and nutrition, and drop-in fitness and exercise classes. The goal is to serve more than 7,000 participants each year.

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Memorial offers class to learn infant CPR, Sept. 7

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Rebecca Teagarden, Memorial Communications, 509-577-5051

Memorial offers class to learn infant CPR
Sept. 7, 2016

Unintentional choking and suffocation are the leading causes of all injury deaths for infants under 1 year of age. Being prepared for such an emergency can make all the difference.

Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital is offering an opportunity for parents and caregivers of infants to learn when a baby needs rescue breathing, how to start CPR and how to care for an infant who’s choking. The class is Sept. 7 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Memorial’s Community Education Center, 2506 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima. No registration is needed. The cost is $5 per person.

This is not a CPR certification class. But knowing how to respond in the first few minutes of an emergency – before professional help arrives – can mean the difference between life and death. If you are the parent or caregiver of an infant, learn infant CPR!

For more information, call 509-248-7322 or visit the Classes and Events page at yakimamemorial.org.

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Memorial offers Grief Recovery Workshop

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  

Contact: Rebecca Teagarden, Memorial Communications, (509) 577-5051

Memorial offers Grief Recovery Workshop

8-week program begins Tuesday, Aug. 9

Memorial is offering a grief recovery workshop for anyone dealing with a loss such as a death, divorce, loss of relationship or identity.
The course is centered on personal discovery, with homework-style exercises designed to help you focus on grief recovery.

The workshop will run for eight consecutive Tuesdays. The first class is Tuesday, Aug. 9, from noon-1 p.m. at Cottage in the Meadow hospice home, located at 1208 S. 48th Ave. in Yakima. The cost is $20, payable on the first day of class, and covers the course, book and materials.

For more information and to register, call 509-574-6746.

 

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Common genes raise diabetes risk, study finds

July 26, 2016— Experts have long known that a person’s risk for getting type 2 diabetes is partly related to genes. But now, a large new study is shining a much brighter light on the disease’s genetic component.

Type 2 diabetes is a serious health problem that affects roughly 1 in 10 people worldwide. Learning more about why some people are more likely to get the disease than others can help scientists develop more effective treatments.

About the study

Researchers studied the DNA of more than 120,000 people of European, South and East Asian, North and South American, and African descent. They compared the genetic information from people without diabetes to those with type 2 diabetes.

They found that most of the genetic risk for diabetes comes from certain common gene changes, or variants. Each of these changes plays a small part in raising a person’s overall diabetes risk.

This knowledge can help scientists find new treatments that take a person’s individual genetic profile into account. However, researchers say more studies are still needed to learn about the gene variants in other groups of people.

Read more about the study in Nature.

The take-home message
Your family history might put you at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. But that doesn’t mean you’re guaranteed to get the disease, says the American Diabetes Association.

Even if you’re predisposed to diabetes, there are plenty of risk factors that you have the power to change. These include:

Being overweight.
Having high blood sugar.
Having high blood pressure.
Having high cholesterol.
Being inactive.
Smoking.
Eating an unhealthy diet.
Talk with your doctor about first steps toward a healthier lifestyle. You might decide to try to eat a healthier diet or exercise more. That can help you lose weight and improve your blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol. If you smoke, it’s important to come up with a plan for quitting. Your doctor can help with that too.

Want to learn more about diabetes prevention? Test your knowledge and find out about your risk factors with this short quiz.

Belonging through ballet

Belonging Through Ballet

Ballet is known for its artistic and graceful movements, spinning and dancing around on the stage.  But for children at Children’s Village it is that and much more. For one little girl in particular, ballet gives her a sense of inclusion and belonging. Taylor never felt a part of a team until she be began ballet. She especially loves that the other kids are unique in their own way but at the same time are just like her. Before Taylor came to the first ballet practice with Children’s Village this spring,  she talked about not wanting to do it because she knew she would have to be in her wheelchair for the first time.  When she arrived for practice there were two other kids in wheelchairs and Taylor was thrilled. She knew she wasn’t going to be alone and realized that the beauty of ballet could be presented by anyone no matter their ability.

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Thank you, Legends Casino!

Owned and operated by the Yakama Nation, each year Legends Casino gives a percentage of its profits to area emergency services and nonprofit agencies.

On Wednesday, the casino handed out nearly $900,000, with $464,307 given to emergency agencies and $434,027 to nonprofits. Cottage in the Meadow, North Star Lodge and Children’s Village were three (3) of nearly 200 nonprofits awarded funds in amounts ranging from $1,000 to more than $10,000.

Cottage in the Meadow Hospice Care Center and Memorial Hospital’s Hospice Program, Compass Care,  received $10,844 to serve patients and families who are struggling significantly with their day to day financial existence, and the illness and impending death of their loved one magnifies these struggles. The hospice emergency fund provides support and assistance to assure quality of life in the final stages of life’s journey.

North Star Lodge Cancer Center received $7,500 to support its cancer care fund which provides hardship assistance for patients who are forced to leave their employment during treatments, and for those who are uninsured, underinsured, or lack caregiver support. This fund helps cancer patients who need transportation to and from appointments, prescription assistance, nutritional supplements, counseling and stress reduction programs.

Children’s Village received $5,000 for its emergency fund to assist families who face significant needs, unexpected obstacles, and extraordinary expenses associated with the medical costs of having a child with special needs. This fund was established to fill in the gaps when no other options are available.

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Aaron Whitefoot from Legends presents a check to Carol Vanevenhoven, Oncology Service Line Director at North Star Lodge.

We are truly grateful to the Yakama Nation Legends Casino for their generosity! These grants allow us to help those patients who have the greatest need while confronting extremely difficult medical challenges.