“Cured of Hep C after 30 years”

Lisa Jaeger was 26 years old when she found out she was infected with Hepatitis C. She got it from her husband in the late 1980s.

Because there was no cure at the time, Lisa Jaeger lived with the deadly virus for the next 30 years. “I believe it was through drug activity. Billy had gotten in with some people he shouldn’t have,” she says.

Lisa, now 56, knew Billy had Hep C, “but, you know, that was back in the old-school days. Back then you didn’t worry about it. You didn’t know it was going come back and attack you later.”

Hep C is called “the silent killer” because people infected back then might only be showing symptoms now — most often cirrhosis and liver cancer. Hepatitis C was not even discovered until 1989. And that makes people born between 1945 and 1965, the baby boom generation, most susceptible to the disease. Before Hep C, sterilization standards were not what they are today, and donated blood wasn’t screened for the virus until 1992.

Although they had been long divorced, Lisa and Billy remained close — right up until he died of liver cancer about five years ago. “I sat with him and I watched him knowing he had cancer and he was dying,” says Lisa. “I sat with Billy until the day he died.

“Of course, I thought that was my path, too. Of course, I thought my liver would explode. I knew people who had Hepatitis C and they died. Nine years ago a friend of mine died. She said, ‘I so want to live, but my body’s shutting down on me.’

“I’ve seen a lot of people pass and I thought, wow, when is my time coming?”

But that was then. Lisa Jaeger today is cured — thanks to the Liver Clinic at Virginia Mason Memorial, Tanda Ferguson, the nurse practitioner who runs the clinic, and to the drug Harvoni. No longer does the Hep C virus course through her bloodstream.

“Now my whole body is coming together,” says Lisa, a smile of relief spreading across her face. She starts to cry, then stops. “I am blessed. When I went to see Tanda I had tried so many things that didn’t work, I didn’t think she could help me. But Tanda said, ‘No, we got it. I’m not giving up on you.

“When you have Hepatitis C you can’t give blood; you have pains in your stomach; it leads to cancer. Still, to this day I go in every six months to see Tanda because of all the medications I’ve taken over the years. We’re always watching for cancers. She’ll have me for the rest of my life.

“Being cured gives me strength to do things I couldn’t before. Now I can go out and help people, which makes me feel real good. There’s a battle with everything all your life. We all have to worry about what we end up with at the end.”

But for Lisa Jaeger, mother of two and grandmother of four, it will not be Hepatitis C.

1 in 30 baby boomers has HEP C. Are you at risk?

Hep C Facts:

  • Chronic (lasting a long time) hepatitis C (Hep C) is a virus that affects the liver. It is the most common blood-borne infection and affects about 3.5 million people in the US
  • Most people do not have symptoms of Hep C for years or even decades, which is why it is commonly called a silent disease
  • If left untreated, Hep C can cause liver damage and even lead to liver cancer

 

DO ANY OF THESE RISK FACTORS APPLY TO YOU?

  • Baby Boomer (born 1945 – 1965)
  • Received blood transfusion, an organ transplant, or kidney dialysis before 1992
  • Tattoos or body piercings iwht unsterilized tools
  • Sharing needles or straws for recreational use (even just one time)
  • Accidental needle sticks (most common with healthcare professionals)
  • Vietnam-era veteran
  • Being born to a mother with Hep C

GET TESTED

  • The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) recommends all Baby Boomers (born 1945 – 1965) get tested for Hep C
  • Ask your healthcare provider to test you for Hep C – this simple blood test is not part of routine blood work

HEP C CAN BE CURED

Cure means the Hep C virus is not detected in the blood when measured 3 months after treatment is completed.

Have questions about Hep C? Contact The Liver Clinic at Memorial Cornerstone Medicine at 509-573 3819.

Source: HEPCHOPE.com