Great Places to be a nurse: Yakima – Eric’s Story

Find out why you should be part of the Virginia Mason Memorial team>>

A 2016 study (link) rated Washington State the best in which to be a nurse Hear why Eric is dedicated to the Yakima Valley and find out why you should consider joining the Virginia Mason Memorial team.  Part of the Virginia Mason Health System, Virginia Mason Memorial is a 226-bed acute-care, nonprofit community hospital that has served Central Washington’s Yakima valley for more than 60 years. Services also include primary and specialty care practices.

How do you know if it’s Cold or Flu?

Because colds and flu share many symptoms, it can be difficult (or even impossible) to tell the difference between them.  The symptoms of flu can include fever or feeling feverish/chills, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches and fatigue (tiredness). Cold symptoms are usually milder than the symptoms of flu. People with colds are more likely to have a runny or stuffy nose. Learn more about Flu at https://www.rightcareyakima.com

Great Places to be a nurse: Yakima

Find out why you should be part of the Virginia Mason Memorial team>>

A 2016 study (link) rated Washington State the best in which to be a nurse. Learn more about being a nurse in Yakima, Washington from Anna , a nurse at Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital. Watch as she discusses her job, the area and her love of the activities available to her and her family throughout the year.

Anna’s Story

Hear why Anna is dedicated to the Yakima Valley and find out why you should consider joining the Virginia Mason Memorial team. Part of the Virginia Mason Health System, Virginia Mason Memorial is a 226-bed acute-care, nonprofit community hospital that has served Central Washington’s Yakima valley for more than 60 years. Services also include primary and specialty care practices

Virginia Mason Memorial consolidates services for patients into one convenient downtown location

Virginia Mason Memorial consolidates services for patients into one convenient downtown location

 

 

 

 

 

YAKIMA (Dec. 22, 2016) – Virginia Mason Memorial is relocating three departments serving patients to one centralized location at the hospital’s downtown building, located at 15 W. Yakima Ave. The move will also bring about 200 employees to the downtown core.

Previously, the nonclinical services and business offices – Medical Records, Hospital Business Services and Memorial Physicians Business Services – were housed separately throughout the community.

“After a year of planning and preparation, we are excited to bring our business office and other support service operations to our downtown location,” said Jim Aberle, Virginia Mason Memorial’s chief operating officer. “This new location provides us the opportunity to consolidate services and allows for future growth.  The move will help free up space and parking at the hospital and at our Memorial Physicians administrative building at 3800 Summitview Ave.  We also believe this move is good for both Virginia Mason Memorial and the vitality of downtown Yakima.”

Virginia Mason Memorial purchased the 85,000-square-foot building, once a fruit-packing facility, earlier this year and has been working since then to update and renovate the space.

The services and opening dates, which are staggered, are:

  • Business Services, where patients can pay hospital bills, will open at the new location
    on Jan. 4.

    • The office is moving from 3803 W. Nob Hill Blvd.
    • The phone number remains: 509-575-8255.
    • Patients can also pay hospital bills online at org/payyourbill.
  • Memorial Physicians Business Services, billing for outpatient, most primary care clinics and specialty clinics, opens Jan. 10.
    • The office is moving from 3800 Summitview Ave.
    • The phone number remains 509-972-1140.
    • Patients can also pay these bills at yakimamp.com.
  • Medical Records, where patients can get copies of their medical records, opens Jan. 16.
    • The office is moving from the hospital’s main campus at 2811 Tieton Drive.
    • The phone number remains 509-575-8082.

Hours of operation at 15 W. Yakima Ave. will be 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

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Memorial Hospital rebrands to reflect affiliation with Virginia Mason Health System

November 2, 2016

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Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital rebrands to reflect affiliation with Virginia Mason Health System

YAKIMA — After more than 60 years of serving the Yakima Valley community as Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital, the hospital and its primary and specialty care clinics have become Virginia Mason Memorial. This new name and brand reflect Memorial’s affiliation with innovative health-care leader Virginia Mason Health System
in Seattle.
Memorial and Virginia Mason affiliated on Jan. 1, 2016. Ever since, teams from both sides of the mountains have been working to combine and streamline care and services. In choosing the new name it was vital that Memorial continue to have a strong identity as the trusted health-care provider and also a prominent economic engine for the Yakima Valley community and in the Central Washington region.

The creation of a health-care system with a local presence in each community — where patients receive the same high-quality, coordinated care at Memorial in Yakima or Virginia Mason in Seattle — was a primary focus for the integration. Also, the affiliation is bringing more resources (physicians, nursing education, best practices in care, expansion of surgical and specialty care) eastward. Virginia Mason Memorial is also working to adopt the Virginia Mason Production system, the internationally recognized method of quality and service improvement that focuses on patients.

About Virginia Mason Memorial
Virginia Mason Memorial, part of the Virginia Mason Health System, is a 226-bed, acute-care, nonprofit, community hospital serving Central Washington’s Yakima Valley. Virginia Mason Memorial includes primary care practices and specialty care services including high-quality cardiac care; cancer care through North Star Lodge; breast health at `Ohana Mammography Center; acute hospice and respite care at Cottage in the Meadow, winner of the Circle of Life Award from the American Hospital Association for innovative palliative and end-of-life care; pain management at Water’s Edge; an advanced NICU unit, the only place in Central Washington that offers specialty care for at-risk infants; advanced services for children with special health care needs at Children’s Village; and The Memorial Foundation, a separate 501c(3) organization that raises funds for innovative health care programs in the Yakima Valley (www.memfound.org).
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Visit Memorial online at www.yakimamemorial.org or on Facebook (www.facebook.com/yakimavalleymemorialhospital), Twitter (www.twitter.com/Yakima_Memorial) or Pinterest (www.pinterest.com/yvmh).

Seattle-based Virginia Mason Health System is a nonprofit regional health care system that includes 336-bed Virginia Mason Hospital; Virginia Mason Memorial in Yakima; medical centers in Seattle, Bainbridge Island, Bellevue, Federal Way, Kirkland, Issaquah and Lynnwood; Bailey-Boushay House, the first skilled-nursing and outpatient chronic care management program in the U.S. designed for people with HIV/AIDS; Benaroya Research Institute, which is internationally recognized for autoimmune disease research; and the Virginia Mason Institute, which trains health care professionals and others from around the world in the Virginia Mason Production System, an innovative management methodology for continually improving quality, safety and efficiency. Virginia Mason online: www.VirginiaMason.org

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Nutritionist vs Dietitian – Is there a difference?

By Kim McCorquodale RDN, CSO, CD
North Star Lodge

The world of nutrition can be a confusing one. There are new studies with new results all of the time. It can be hard to decide what the right thing to eat is or who to trust. And there are many people anxious to help you with those choices. How do you know what to do? I thought it might be helpful to start with what the letters that follow a person’s name.

I listed “my letters” above and will explain them all. The first, RDN, stands for “registered dietitian nutritionist.” Many “registered dietitians” (RDs) have started to add the N at the end because the word “dietitian” can be limiting or confusing. But, if it says either RD or RDN that means the person is a health professional who has university qualifications consisting of a 4-year Bachelor Degree in Nutrition and Dietetics or a 3-year Science Degree followed by a Master Degree in Nutrition and Dietetics, including a certain period of practical training in different hospital and community settings (in the U.S. 1200 hours of supervised practice are required in different areas). They must meet national standards for professional legislation which includes passing a comprehensive exam and obtaining continuing education requirements.

The CSO after my name means I am a “certified specialist in oncology.” This means I have practiced a minimum of 2000 hours in the field of oncology nutrition in the past 5 years and have passed a rigorous exam. This exam must be retaken every 5 years to ensure the CSO remains current in the ever-changing field of oncology nutrition.

The CD after my name stands for “certified dietitian.” This simply means that the state of Washington has reviewed my qualifications and found they meet current standards. This is a credential that must be annually renewed.

The term “nutritionist” is harder to pin down. A “nutritionist” is a non-accredited title that may apply to somebody who has a PhD in Nutrition or to someone who has given themselves the title and to something in between. The term “nutritionist” is not protected by law in almost all countries, so people with different levels of knowledge can call themselves a “nutritionist.” It does not necessarily mean the person is uneducated or a “quack” or they are supplying inaccurate information. It just means it is up to you to make certain the person you are consulting is a qualified health professional and has the expertise. This task is much more difficult when the person does not have an accredited title.

Of course, all the letters in the world are not a 100% guarantee of the perfect health professional for your needs. You still need to investigate them carefully and make sure you understand any advice given to you. But, I hope the above information helps you make an informed decision in the interesting world of nutrition.

Film preview for “Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies” open to public March 24 at The Seasons

CANCER logo white medKen Burns documentary based on best-selling book, serves as biography on cancer

(YAKIMA) – Memorial Family of Services and Seattle public television station KCTS 9 are pleased to host a film screening of “Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies” on Tuesday, March 24, at The Seasons Performance Hall in Yakima.

This three-part, six-hour television miniseries, presented by preeminent documentary filmmaker Ken Burns and directed by award-winning filmmaker Barak Goodman, is based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, “The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer.” The film shares the history of cancer – from the ancient Greeks who believed it to be a “black bile” in the body, to 1950s social norms that made cancer an unspoken topic, to the research and clinical trials being done today. The film also highlights the scientists who made cancer research their mission, as well as the personal stories of cancer survivors and caregivers.

A panel discussion and Q&A follows the 40-minute film screening. Participants include:

  • Vicky Jones, Medical Oncologist
  • Shawn Murphy, Cancer Survivor
  • Hector Torango, Cancer Survivor and Caregiver

Everyone is likely to be touched by cancer at some point – either to be diagnosed with it or to have a loved one touched by it. This event presents an opportunity to learn more about the film, which will be airing on KCTS 9 over three evenings – March 30, 31 and April 1 – as well as to learn from and participate in a discussion about cancer care from people who have experienced it firsthand.

This event is free and open to the public. Space is available first come, first serve. Registration is not required, but people are encouraged to RSVP at yakimamemorial.org/PBSevent.

For more information about the film and to see personal stories from the filmmakers, cancer researchers, cancer survivors and caregivers for loved ones who have had the disease, visit cancerfilms.org.

What:              Film screening, followed by panel discussion

“Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies”

Where:            The Seasons Performance Hall

                        101 N. Naches Ave., Yakima

When:             March 24, 2015

Doors open at 6 p.m. Program begins at 6:30 p.m.